New Draft on Analysing Monuments with Students

Körber, Andreas (2019): How to Read a Monument as a Narrative in Class – a Suggestion. [unfinished draft]. In Historisch denken lernen [Blog des AB Geschichtsdidaktik; Universität Hamburg], 8/27/2019. Available online at https://historischdenkenlernen.userblogs.uni-hamburg.de/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/2019_08_K%C3%B6rber-How-to-Read-a-Monument-as-Narrative-in-Class_1b-lit.pdf.

This is a new draft of a suggestion for analysing monuments with students. Please comment.
August 28th: I added some aspects (in the PDF in green).

2019_08_Körber How to Read a Monument as Narrative in Class_2-lit.pdf

==
Andreas Körber (Hamburg)
How to Read a Monument as a Narrative in Class – a Suggestion [unfinished draft]

I.
The following suggestions for addressing monuments in history education are based on a conception of monuments as proto- or abbreviate narratives1 by a present actor about a certain past and its relevance. Even though in many discussions about the removal of monuments, people deplore the removal of their “past”,2 what is at stake, is not the past itself, but a specific and often privileged communication of a certain interpretation of some past context, personage or event.
As such, they also address someone (mostly a specific group) – sometimes explicitly, sometimes implicitly only. These “addressees” need, however, not be identical with those really exploring the monument. But these (the actual “audience”) will also feel addressed, and since they might (will) be diverse, in quite different ways. This communicative shift is far from being an exception – it might even be the rule in times of change and of increased diversity of our societies. Consider, e.g., a monument hailing some hero of an imperial war addressing its audience with a reference to “our empire” visited by an immigrant British citizen. This applies not only to monuments depicting a group’s (e.g. nation’s) “own pride and pain” but also to critical memorials addressing a group’s actions in the past which are considered as problematic (to say the least) in retrospect. Consider, e.g., Germany’s memorials at former places of concentration camps. In most cases, they are called “Gedenkstätten” – “sites of remembrance”. As such, already, they (have to) express their narrative logic in diverse from, given that the society they address is not only sociologically and culturally diverse but also with respect to the past they refer to. For survivors and dependants (of both survivors and fatal victims), they are (mainly) a place of commemoration their own loss and also victimhood. In many cases these places tell a story of “we have this place for remembering what they (the Germans) have done to us”. But even within this group, there are many who are and still consider themselves Germans. For them, the narrative is quite different. And of course there is a difference between mourning a loss and remembering a survival or even own resistance. An inscription on the 1965 monument at Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial in Hamburg, e.g., reading “Euer Leiden, Euer Kampf und Euer Tod sollen nicht vergebens sein” (“Your Suffering, Your Fight and Your Death Shall Not be in Vain”) does prominently address a group of prisoners who actively resisted. But what is more, most of these places respectively monuments there are also known as “Mahnmale”, i.e. “monument” in the literal sense of “admonishing” someone. Who can or should be admonished there? Referring to the Nazi Crimes, they can (and have to) do it in two different ways: Towards surviving victims and their dependants they may be read as “Never let that be done unto you again” – but addressing the German society as such they refer to “Remember” (publicly, that is) “what you have done” (both to “others” and to “some of your own”, that is) – “and make sure that this never happens again”. Germans among the victims of NS-crimes (Jewish Germans, Communists, Social Democrats Jehova’s Witnesses, and many others), then, will specifically have to select (not choose) how they are addressed.

Metaphorically, monuments don’t cease to “speak” if addressing a different audience from what was intended or supposed. Since all perception and analysis (“de-construction”1) of a narrative also requires and implies re-constructive mental processes, the resulting narratives in diverse publica will differ, partially by becoming more complex. Consider the 1925 war monument in front of Hamburg-Altona’s Johannis Church: It depicts three medieval warriors with bare chest and leaning on a long sword.2 The inscription reads: “Den Gefallenen zum dankbaren Gedächtnis, den Lebenden zur Mahnung, den kommenden Geschlechtern zur Nacheiferung” (“to the fallen in grateful memory, to the living as a reminder, to the coming generations for emulation”). Even though there surely are some youths on the right-wing of the political spectrum to whom this may appeal, both most of them will have to engage in twofold interpretation: “Ethnic” will have to differentiate between their own position and perspective and that of the youth in the Weimar Republic, in order to recognize the message and to make their own sense of it, Germans with what is often termed as “migratory background” will have even more aspects to combine.

All these considerations also hold true for the “speaker’s position” in a memorial or monument’s narrative: Let’s take the example of German Concentration Camp memorials again: Who is it, admonishing the victims not to be victimized again, and (more prominently) the Germans not to become perpetrators again? In fact, one can even detect another layer in such monuments. The fact that (belatedly enough) the German society today designates and supports these “Gedenkstätten” (or even hosts them institutionally) can also be considered a message to both the survivors, their dependants and to the world at large: “See and that we address this past” – possibly also with a call for support: “By witnessing this commitment of ours to remembering this past – help us to resist and even fight tendencies to abandon it and to return to a socio-centric way or commemoration” again.3 But is it “the German Society” speaking here – or some specific group (e.g. the government, a political faction, …) speaking “for” the German people or in lieu of? Just like the targeted audience of a monument seldomly is just the one really visiting it (and trying to make sense of it), the position of “authorship” needs to be differentiated.
Given all this, the conventional questions of (1) who erected a monument (2) to (remembering) whom, (3) for what purpose, (4) with whose money, and to what effect (e.g. of appraisal, critique), are still necessary, but need to be complemented.
As a result, a monument’s “message” or “meaning” is neither fixed nor arbitrary, but rather a spectrum of narrative relations between a range of perceived-“authors” or ”speakers” and a similar range of targeted and factual addressees.
Furthermore, their interrelation is of utmost interest and may strongly differ: Does (and if so: in what way) the monuments message imply the author and the addressee(s) to belong to the same group? It it “intransitive” in that it at least seemingly expresses the fact of “remembering” (“We both know that we have knowledge about this past and we express that it is of importance to us”), while in fact it serves either as a transitive reminder (“I know that you know, but you must not forget”) or even as a first-time introduction of the addressee into the subject at hand (which will be the mode in most cases of visiting monuments with students). So where “remembering” and even “commemoration” is suggested and meant, “telling” is the factual mode.
Furthermore, commemorative modes are manifold. Monuments can not only call for neutral “remembering”, but also for revering or condemning, for feelings (pride and pain) – and they can appeal for action, e.g. for following an example. In culturally diverse societies, the specific linguistic and artistic modes of expressing may not be clear to all students, possibly leading to misunderstandings, but possibly also to identifying alternative readings which are worth considering.

II.
Another aspect is crucial: In (post-)modern, diverse and heterogeneous societies (at least), it will not suffice that each individual is able to think about the past and its representations in the public sphere, to consider the messages and to relate to them individually. The common task of organizing a peaceful and democratic life together within society as well as in respect to foreign relations requires that the individual members of society do not only sport their own historical consciousness – possibly different from that of their neighbours, they will have to be able to relate to these other perceptions, conceptualisations, interpretations and evaluations of past and history and to the appeals they hold for them. In plural societies it is not enough to just know history yourself and to be able to think historically – its is paramount to have at least some insight into the historical thinking of others and to be able to communicate about it. This also refers to monuments. What is needed is not only knowledge and insight about some possible different interpretations (as e.g. exemplified by classical or representative ones taken from literature), but also an insight into the actual (ongoing, possibly still unsure, blurred, unfinished) interpretations of others in one’s one relevant contexts. Learning about history in inclusive societies, therefore, be they diverse with regard to cultural, social or other differentiations, requires a dimension of mutuality, of learning not only about history and the past, but also about the other members of society and their relations to it, the meanings it holds for them, their questions, their hypotheses, etc.4

III.
On the backdrop of all these considerations, the following guideline therefore does not venture to help students to perceive the “true” “meaning” of a monument, but rather to foster communication about what is perceived as its “message” and meaning by possibly different people. Some of these perceptions will be affirmed by being shared among several and possibly quite different users, while others might be different. This, however, does not necessarily render them wrong or nonsensical (which, they might be, however). Comparing different answers might both sharpen the individual’s perception and broaden it to perceive relevance and meanings of memorials to people with different background, interest, culture, interest, and so on. These forms of relevance might (often will) differ from that intended by those who erected the monument. What does that mean? Is a monument dysfunctional if people feel addressed by it in a way differing from that originally intended? Or does it keep relevance but change significance?
These questions do not replace but complement other approaches to analysing monuments. It might be sensible, though, to not apply them after more direct approaches, but to use them as a start, resulting in more specific (and possibly also more) of questions to explore.
The questions can be used in different ways. It will be rather tedious to just answer them one by one – especially including all bullet points. The latter are rather meant as suggestions for formulating an answer to the main questions above them.
To work individually is possible, but because of the concept explained above, it might be more fruitful to apply a “Think-Pair-Share” -system and first work independently, then compare suggestions in small groups in a way which does not only look for common solutions, but also explores and evaluates differences, and then share both insights and remaining or newly arisen questions with the whole group.

Task:
I. Respond to the questions 1-6, using the bullet points below as directions and suggestions. Try e.g. to complete the given sentences, but formulate your own answer to the main questions. If you are unsure or have additional ideas, formulate your questions (instead)!
II. Compare your nots with your partner(s). Don’t standardize them! Instead: Formulate (a) a new version of those aspects which were similar and (b) on your differences! In what way did/do you differ? Make a suggestion why that might be! Keep your original notes! They will be valuable in further discussions!
III. Report on your findings from II to your class! Compare with insights and questions of other groups!

=======================

  1. Communicative Explicitness:
    In how far does the monument (seem to) …

    • … present or suggest a specific person or group in a speaker position? (e.g. “We, <…> erected this monument”?)
    • … address a specific person/group or suggests to be directed towards a specific group? (“You, <…>…” / “to <…>”)5
    • … address a third-party as some kind of witness as to the fact of remembering?6
    • … refer to some third party as involved in the past which is narrated? (e.g. “what they have done to us”)
  2. Narrative Explicitness:
    In how far does the monument (seem to) …

    • … presuppose that the recipient/addressee has sufficient knowledge about the context referred to?
    • … explicitly construct a specific context (explicitly tell a story),
    • … rely on a certain amount of common knowledge of speaker and addressee?7
    • …introduce actors, contexts and events?
    • ?
  3. Transitive/Intransitive communication:
    In how far does the monument (seem to) …

    • … embrace the recipient/addressee as a member of the same group (“we”) as the (purported) speaker?
    • … address the recipient/addressee as a member of a different group (“you”) as the (purported) speaker?
  4. . “Mono-” or “Heterogloss” communication:
    In how far does the monument (seem to) …

    • … embrace the recipient/addressee as undoubtedly having the same perspective/sharing the evaluation (“monogloss”)? e.g. by being implicit about it,
    • … address the recipient/addressee as not necessarily sharing the same perspective and evaluation (“heterogloss”)? e.g. by being explicit in statement, evaluation, etc.
  5. Communicative Intent:
    What is the relation of authors’/addressee(s)/third-party’s role in the (proto-)narrated story?, e.g.

    • Generic
      1. “<…> want(s) <…> to <know/remember/acknowledge/accept/judge> as <…>”
    • Specific:
      • “’We’ <…> want ‘you’ <…> (and others) to know what ‘we’ <…> have achieved!” (as e.g. in “Stranger, tell the Spartans …“)
      • „’We’ <…>want ‘us’ <…> to not forget what ‘we’ <…> have achieved!” (as e.g. in Monuments to Unification)
      • „’We’ <…> want ‘us’ <…> to not forget what ‘we’ <…> have caused!” (as e.g. in German Concentration Camp Memorials)
      • “’We’ <…> want ‘you’ <…> to know that ‘we’ <…> submit ourselves to not forgetting/remembering!”
      • „’We’ <…> want ‘us’ <…> to not forget what ‘they’ <…> have done to ‘us’ <…>!”
      • „’’We’ <…> want ‘you’ <…> to know that ‘we’ <…> acknowledge what ‘you’ <…> have done to ‘us’ <…>!”
    • In how far does one (or several) of the following forms describe the communicative intention of the monument?
      • to inform, e.g. if it introduces and details the past incidents, contexts etc.;
      • to confirm, e.g. if it almost tacitly – without giving details – refers to a past context which both author and addressee share knowledge about; intending to secure acknowledgement of factuality;
      • to commemorate, e.g. if it almost tacitly – without giving details – refers to a past context which both author and addressee share knowledge about, intending to express a certain evaluation;
      • to mourn, e.g. if it refers to a past context which both author and addressee share knowledge about, intending to express a feeling of loss of someone/something valued);
      • to remind, e.g. if it refers to a past context which both author and addressee should share knowledge about, intending to
        • prevent forgetting;
        • secure a certain evaluation which is supposed to have been shared before?
        • appeal, e.g. if it asks (invites?/requests?/summons?) the recipient/addressee to feel/identify/act in a certain way, e.g. by
          • referring to (a) person(s) as responsible for something, admonishing the addressee to evaluate this/these persons in a certain way, but not to follow her/his example, either
          • heroizing: presenting (a) person(s) as responsible for a special achievement and therefore to be revered;
          • giving thanks: presenting (a) person(s) as responsible for a special achievement and expressing gratitude;
          • condemning: presenting (a) person(s) as responsible for a special achievement and therefore to be condemned;
          • to present examples / role models, e.g. if it by presents (a) person(s) as responsible for something and addresses the recipient/addressee as possibly being in a similar position and having similar capacities, urging her/him either
            • to follow the example (e.g. of taking action, of resisting);
            • to not follow the example (e.g. of going along …);
          • to express gratitude, e.g. if it presents the addressee and/or his group as responsible for something good, expressing gratitude;
          • to accuse, e.g. if it presents the addressee and/or his group as responsible for something bad, expressing contempt;
    • other (specify) …
      ======
      References

      • „Gemütszustand eines total besiegten Volkes“. Höcke-Rede im Wortlaut. Nach dem Transkript von Konstantin Nowotny (2017). In Der Tagesspiegel, 1/19/2017. Available online at https://www.tagesspiegel.de/politik/hoecke-rede-im-wortlaut-gemuetszustand-eines-total-besiegten-volkes/19273518-all.html, checked on 3/14/2019.
      • Körber, Andreas (2014): Historical Thinking and Historical Competencies as Didactic Core Concepts. In Helle Bjerg, Andreas Körber, Claudia Lenz, Oliver von Wrochem (Eds.): Teaching historical memories in an intercultural perspective. Concepts and methods : experiences and results from the TeacMem project. 1st ed. Berlin: Metropol Verlag (Reihe Neuengammer Kolloquien, Bd. 4), pp. 69–96.
      • Körber, Andreas (2015): Historical consciousness, historical competencies – and beyond? Some conceptual development within German history didactics. Available online at http://www.pedocs.de/volltexte/2015/10811/pdf/Koerber_2015_Development_German_History_Didactics.pdf.
      • Körber, Andreas (2019; in print): Inklusive Geschichtskultur — Bestimmungsfaktoren und Ansprüche. In Sebastian Barsch, Bettina Degner, Christoph Kühberger, Martin Lücke (Eds.): Handbuch Diversität im Geschichtsunterricht. Zugänge einer inklusiven Geschichtsdidaktik. Frankfurt am Main: Wochenschau Verlag, pp. 250–258.
      • Körber, Andreas (2019; unpubl.): Geschichtslernen in der Migrationsgesellschaft. Sich in und durch Kontroversen zeitlich orientieren lernen. deutlich überarbeiteter Vortrag; unpubliziert. Geschichten in Bewegung“. Universität Paderborn. Paderborn, 6/14/2019.
      • Körber, Andreas; Schreiber, Waltraud; Schöner, Alexander (Eds.) (2007): Kompetenzen historischen Denkens. Ein Strukturmodell als Beitrag zur Kompetenzorientierung in der Geschichtsdidaktik. Neuried: Ars Una Verlags-Gesellschaft (Kompetenzen, 2).
      • Lévesque, Stéphane (2018): Removing the “Past”. Debates Over Official Sites of Memory. In Public History Weekly 2018 (29). DOI: 10.1515/phw-2018-12570.
      • Rüsen, Jörn; Fröhlich, Klaus; Horstkötter, Hubert; Schmidt, Hans Günther (1991): Untersuchungen zum Geschichtsbewußtsein von Abiturienten im Ruhrgebiet. Empirische Befunde einer quantitativen Pilotstudie. In Bodo von Borries (Ed.): Geschichtsbewusstsein empirisch. Pfaffenweiler: Centaurus (Geschichtsdidaktik : […], Studien, Materialien, [N.F.], Bd. 7), pp. 221–344.
      • Ziogas, Ioannis (2014): Sparse Spartan Verse. Filling Gaps in the Thermopylae Epigram. In Ramus 43 (2), pp. 115–133. DOI: 10.1017/rmu.2014.10.
  1. Cf. Rüsen et al. 1991, 230f. Cf. also my comment on Lévesque 2018, ibid. []
  2. Cf. Lévesque 2018. []
  3. That this danger is far from being hypothetical can be seen in the light of a speech by the right-wing (AFD)-politician Björn Höcke in Dresden on 18 January 2017, where he called for a “U-turn” in German memory culture, giving up the politics of “Vergangenheitsbewältigung”. In the same speech, he reproached to the Berlin Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (the “Holocaust-Memorial”) as a “monument of shame”, which of course it is, but in a different sense: What Höcke meant is a “shameful” monument, but for the current German memorial culture he attacked, to address one’s own (in group’s) “crime and shame” is nothing shameful, but a necessity. Cf. the documentation of the speech in „Gemütszustand eines total besiegten Volkes“ 2017 (as of 28.8.2019). Any sense of pride, however, based on the development of this “critical” and even “negative” memory culture would be at least problematic – it would undermine the mind-set. The question remains of how to address this as an achievement without resorting to concepts of “pride”. []
  4. Cf. on the concept of inclusive history culture: Körber 2019; i. Dr.. Körber 2019. []
  5. As e.g. in a Hamburg monument commemorating the town’s dead of WW1: “Vierzig Tausend Söhne der Stadt ließen ihr Leben für Euch” (“Forty Thousand Sons of [our] Town Gave Their Lives for You”). []
  6. As e.g. in the verse of Simonides of Ceos (556–468 BCE) on the Spartan defenders at the Thermopylae, which Herodotus (VII, 228) reports to have been erected on the spot: “Oh stranger, tell the Lacedaemonians that we lie here, obedient to their words.” (transl. by Ioannis Ziogas). The original did not survive, but in 1955 a modern plate was erected bearing the Greek text again. For this and different translations of the inscription see the English Wikipedia-article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Thermopylae#Epitaph_of_Simonides (as of 27/8/2019). For a discussion of the wording see Ziogas 2014. []
  7. A monument in Oslo, on the premises of Åkershus Slot, near the Norwegian museum of resistance against German Occupation in WW2 (the Museum), e.g. states „de kjempet de falt – de gav oss alt“ (literally: „They fought, they fell – they gave us everything“), or rather: „they gave (sacrificed) everything for us.“ Even though the monument depicts tools and devices which can be used in resistance operations, the monument clearly requires knowledge of the whole context of Norwegian resistance. Körber 2014, p. 87. []

Blogbeitrag zu unseren Projekt „Histogames“

Hohberg, Josefine (Josy) (20.8.2019): „Projekt „Histogames“: Videospiele im Geschichtsunterricht“ In: RagingTeaParty.

Auf „RagingTeaParty“ ist heute ein Blogbeitrag der Studierenden Josephine Hoberg (Josy) zum zweisemestrigen, vom Arbeitsbereich Public History (Fachbereich Geschichte, Fakultät für Geisteswissenschaften) und der Geschichtsdidaktik (Fakultät für Erziehungswissenschaft) gemeinsam gestalteten Kooperationsprojekt „Histogames“ erschienen. Der Artikel mit dem Titel „Projekt ‚Histogames‘: Videospiele im Geschichtsunterricht“ ist hier zu finden.

Das Projekt HistoGames wird gefördert vom Lehrlabor L3Prof der Universität Hamburg. In diesem Projekt lehren Dr. Daniel Giere, Alexander Buck und Dr. Nico Nolden, der das Projekt auch koordiniert. Die Projektleitung haben Prof. Dr. Thorsten Logge und Prof. Dr. Andreas Körber.

Vgl. dazu auch folgende ältere Artikel:

  1. Nolden, Nico (31.10.2018/5.11.2018): „Geschichtsdidaktik und Public History in Hamburg entwickeln Handreichungen zu Geschichte in digitalen Spielen zusammen mit dem AKGWDS“ in: gespielt.
  2. Buck, Alexander; Körber, Andreas (26.11.2018): HistoGames im Unterricht?! in diesem Blog.

Handreichung zur Erschließung von Denkmälern: Studentische Arbeit erschienen

Bäumer, Marlon; Rentschler, Hannah; Roers, Benjamin; Weise, Mara (2019): Handreichung zu Erschließung von Denkmälern. Hamburg: Universität Hamburg (https://geschichtssorten.blogs.uni-hamburg.de/denkmal/).

Aus dem vom L3Prof-Lehrlabor geförderten Kooperationsprojekt „Teaching Staff Resource Center (TRSC)“, einem gemeinsames mit dem Arbeitsbereich Public History (Prof. Dr. Thorsten Logge, Dr. Sebastian Kubon) und der Landeszentrale für Politische Bildung (Dr. Sabine Bamberger-Stemmann) durchgeführten Lehrpojekt zur Erkundung unterschiedlicher Geschichtssorten (Logge) und der Erarbeitung von Handreichungen zu ihrer Erschließung, ist eine erste Handreichung erschienen:
Bäumer, Marlon; Rentschler, Hannah; Roers, Benjamin; Weise, Mara (2019): Handreichung zu Erschließung von Denkmälern. Hamburg: Universität Hamburg (https://geschichtssorten.blogs.uni-hamburg.de/denkmal/).

Tagung: „Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte.“ Geschichte lernen und Gesellschaft. (29./30.03.2019) Leitung: Prof. Dr. F. Hinz (PH Freiburg), Prof. Dr. A. Körber (Univ. Hamburg)

„Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte.“ Geschichte lernen und Gesellschaft. (29./30.03.2019); Leitung: Prof. Dr. F. Hinz (PH Freiburg), Prof. Dr. A. Körber (Univ. Hamburg); Ort: Aula der PH Freiburg; https://www.ph-freiburg.de/sozialwissenschaften/aktuelles-profil/geschichte/higlights-aus-lehre-und-forschung-der-abteilung-geschichte/tagungen/geschichtskultur-public-history-angewandte-geschichte.html

Geschichtskultur – Public History – Angewandte Geschichte. Geschichte lernen und Gesellschaft. (29./30.03.2019)

Leitung: Prof. Dr. F. Hinz (PH Freiburg), Prof. Dr. A. Körber (Univ. Hamburg)

Ort: Aula der PH Freiburg

Tagungsprogramm

Poster

Die Tagung wird durch die DFG finanziert.

 

Geschichte wird heute vornehmlich in der außerakademischen Geschichtskultur verhandelt. Dies geht so weit, dass nicht zuletzt in Bezug auf das Mittelalter bereits von einem „Sekundärmittelalter“ gesprochen wird (Valentin Groebner). Die Geschichtswissenschaft reagierte auf diese Entwicklung nicht nur – aber auch nicht zuletzt – im deutschsprachigen Raum mit Einrichtung von Professuren für „Public History“ und „Angewandte Geschichte“ sowie Etablierung entsprechender Inhalte in Lehrplänen und Geschichtsschulbüchern. Doch diese Maßnahmen kranken an zwei Defiziten, zu deren Behebung diese Tagung beitragen soll:

Erstens ist derzeit keineswegs klar, was genau unter den Etiketten „Public History“, „Angewandte Geschichte“, „Erinnerungskulturen“, „Geschichtskultur“ etc. genau zu verstehen ist, d.h. vor allem, ob es Vergangenheitsdeutungen sind, die für die oder aber von der Öffentlichkeit entwickelt werden, und was genau in den jeweiligen Begriffen selbst oder ihren Umschreibungen als „öffentliche Geschichte“ die „Öffentlichkeit“ meint.

Zweitens handelt es sich bei den genannten Studiengängen um rein akademische Veranstaltungen. Die Schere zwischen akademischer Erforschung der Geschichte und populären Umgangsweisen mit ihr ist jedoch bisweilen beträchtlich. Historiker*innen drehen nun einmal meist keine Historienfilme, sie zeichnen keine Historiencomics etc. Wenn sie gleichwohl den populären Umgang mit Geschichte in all seiner Vielfalt analysieren, tappen sie daher oftmals im Dunkeln. Nicht selten bleibt es bei einer Beschreibung geschichtskultureller Manifestationen, doch sind diese streng genommen Sachquellen, nicht populäre Geschichtskultur, die stets den lebendigen Umgang mit Geschichte bedeutet. Mit den Akteur*innen der Geschichtskultur wird seitens der Hochschulen nur sporadisch Kontakt gesucht.

Das Feld der Geschichtskultur ist somit aufgrund seines Charakters als vergangen­heitsbezogenes, soziales wie kulturelles Handlungsfeld Gegenstand von Reflexion nicht nur auf der Basis wissenschaftlicher Forschung, sondern auch seitens der breiteren Öffentlichkeit. Insofern Geschichtswissenschaft inklusive Geschichtsdidaktik nicht nur historische Quellen, sondern zentral auch gesellschaftliche Formen des „Umgangs“ mit Geschichte, ihre „Nutzung“ und andere Bezugnahmen auf sie erforscht, bedarf es systematischer Perspektivenverschränkung. Fernziel des Arbeitszusammenhangs, in dem die Tagung steht, ist vor diesem Hintergrund die Herausgabe einer Handbuch-Publikation, in welcher eine Reihe wesentlicher geschichtskulturelle Praxen und Objektivationen zunächst sowohl aus den verschränkten Perspektiven von Praktiker*innen und Wissenschaftler*innen unter gemeinsamen Fragestellungen vorgestellt werden und sodann sowohl thematisch als auch epochenspezifischen Analysen unterzogen werden. Die Tagung soll den dafür nötigen Austausch sowohl zwischen Wissenschaftler*innen (aus den Bereichen verschiedener Kulturwissenschaften) und Praktiker*innen (1) über thematisch fokussierte Paarungen hinaus zu einer übergreifenden Diskussion zusammenführen und (2) sich aus den jeweiligen Beispielen sowie (3) aus systematischen Perspektiven auf diese sicht- und diskutierbar machen.

Grundlage der Tagung werden sein: (1) eine Reihe von jeweils bestimmte geschichtskulturelle Handlungsfelder thematisierende, von Autor*innen-Tandems aus Wissenschaft und Praxis im Vorfeld erarbeitete und (2) jeweils vier von Wissenschaftler*innen verfasste thematische und epochenspezifische Beiträge. Teilnehmer*innen sind die Autor*innen der Beiträge und ein gezielt dazu geladenes internationale Fachpublikum aus den Bereichen Geschichtswissenschaft, public history und history education.

=== Nachtrag ===

Nun auch mit Bildern auf der Webseite der PH Freiburg:

https://www.ph-freiburg.de/sozialwissenschaften/aktuelles-profil/geschichte/higlights-aus-lehre-und-forschung-der-abteilung-geschichte/tagungen/geschichtskultur-public-history-angewandte-geschichte.html

HistoGames im Unterricht?! (Alexander Buck, Andreas Körber)

Buck, Alexander; Körber, Andreas (2018): HistoGames im Unterricht?! Geschichtsdidaktische Perspektiven auf eine aktuelle Geschichtssorte. Fragen und Überlegungen aus Anlass eines Lehrerbildungsprojekts an der Universität Hamburg. In: Historisch Denken Lernen. Arbeitsbereich Geschichtsdidaktik der Universität Hamburg. 26.11.2018.

Geschichtsdidaktische Perspektiven auf eine aktuelle Geschichtssorte. Fragen und Überlegungen aus Anlass eines Lehrerbildungsprojekts an der Universität Hamburg

Geschichtsbezogene digitale Spiele in der Schule – inwiefern ist das wirklich ein Thema mit eigenem Wert für Geschichtsdidaktik und Lehrer*innenbildung? — ein follow-up zu Nico Noldens jüngstem Beitrag im Blog „gespielt“ des Arbeitskreises Geschichtswissenschaft und digitale Spiele (Nolden 2018b).

In der Wissenschaft wie in der Öffentlichkeit erfahren geschichtsbezogene Computerspiele in den letzten Jahren eine erhöhte Wahrnehmung und Aufmerksamkeit. Grundlage ist ihr hoher Anteil sowohl an der gegenwärtigen Produktion von Geschichtsmedien als auch an der Mediennutzung heutiger Jugendlicher.

Als eine Begründung für eine Nutzung solcher Spiele im Unterricht reicht vielen Lehrer*innen und Lehramtsstudierenden die Faszination für Vergangenheit und Geschichte, die solche Spiele offenkundig nicht nur bedienen, sondern auch aktualisieren oder überhaupt erst hervorrufen, aber offenkundig (und zu Recht) nicht aus. Darauf deuten jedenfalls auch die Rückmeldungen hin, die wir (die Arbeitsbereiche Public History und Geschichtsdidaktik an der Universität Hamburg) von Schulen und Kolleg*innen in Hamburg und im Umland auf Anfragen zur Beteiligung an unserem Lehr- und Entwicklungsprojekt „HistoGames“ erhalten haben, in dem wir fachwissenschaftliche und fachdidaktische Perspektiven auf historische Digitale Spiele nicht nur theoretisch, sondern auch personell zusammenbringen, insofern einerseits Lehrende der Public History (Nico Nolden) und der Fachdidaktik (Alexander Buck und Daniel Giere) die Veranstaltungen gemeinsam leiten, andererseits Lehramts- und Fachwissenschafts-Studierende gemeinsam unter Einbringung ihrer jeweiligen Perspektiven gemeinsamen Spiele analysieren, Unterrichtskonzepte dazu entwickeln und ihre Nutzung sowie die dabei zu beobachtenden Prozesse historischen Denkens und Lernens erforschen.

Hintergrund einer derart komplexen Thematisierung des Phänomens „digitale historische Spiele“ sind eine Reihe untereinander durchaus in Spannung stehende – Problem- und Fragestellungen; darunter: inwiefern die Nutzung solcher Spiele im Geschichtsunterricht …

  • geeignet ist, mit aktuellen interaktiven Medien sozialisierte und von ihnen faszinierte Jugendliche für eine Beschäftigung mit Geschichte zu begeistern, wie sie etwa im Bericht von Elena Schulz in GameStar aufscheint (Schulz 2018), oder aber
  • auf eine Kapitulation des Geschichtsunterrichts vor Geschichtsbildern und -interpretationen hinaus, die produziert wurden von den Nutzer*innen unbekannt bleibenden, wissenschaftlich nicht ausgewiesenen Autor*innen mit kaum zu durchschauender Kombination wirtschaftlicher und politischer Interessen (vgl. etwa die Debatte um die politische Positionierung der Autoren von „Wolfenstein II“; vgl. auch allgemeiner Meyer o.J.); bzw.
  • inwiefern ein spezieller Einsatz solcher Spiele überhaupt nötig ist, weil schon ein konventioneller, umfassender auf Kenntnisse ausgerichteter Geschichtsunterricht eine zuverlässige Basis bzw. Folie gesicherter Informationen und Deutungen dafür bereitstellt, dass jugendliche Nutzer*innen das ihnen darin Begegnende einordnen können, bzw.
  • allgemeine, für andere Medien (u.a. Bilder, Videos, Museen, Ausstellungen, Webseiten usw.) entwickelte Konzepte, Kompetenzen und Fähigkeiten ausreichen, um auch die in solchen Spielen enthaltenen Geschichten für Jugendliche wirksam im Unterricht zu de-konstruieren.

Hinzu kommt die Frage, inwiefern die beim Umgang mit solchen Spielen ablaufenden kognitiven und emotionalen Prozesse sowie die dazugehörigen Fähigkeiten, Fertigkeiten und Bereitschaften überhaupt wesentlich als historisch aufgefasst werden und damit einer disziplinspezifischen Analyse und Förderung unterzogen werden können. Werden sie nicht zumindest weitestgehend überlagert von nicht-historischen Facetten einer Faszination durch Technik, Interaktivität und Agency – gewissermaßen medial, nicht historisch bestimmter Macht- (und ggf. auch Leidens-)Phantasien?

Inwiefern und mit welchen Fragestellungen und Zielen sollte also Geschichtsdidaktik sich mit solchen Spielen befassen und Geschichtsunterricht sie nutzen?

Unter den Studierenden, die sich überaus reichlich für dieses thematisch und strukturell innovative Lehrexperiment anmeldeten (so das gar nicht alle zugelassen werden konnten), zeigten sich gleich zu Beginn durchaus unterschiedliche Perspektiven und Zugänge zum Gegenstand: Während für einige Studierende das Feld der digitalen historischen Spiele selbst noch eher neu ist und sie Erkundung, Analyse und Didaktisierung miteinander verschränken (müssen), sind auch einige darunter, die einerseits als „Zocker“ (so eine Selbstbezeichnung) mehr als ausreichende Kenntnisse einzelner (nicht nur historischer) Spiele und Expertise in ihrer Bewältigung („in GTA5 kenne ich jede Straße“) besitzen, ebenso aber von abwertenden Kommentaren über ihr Hobby in Schule berichten.

Dieses Spannungsfeld zwischen hoher und geringer Erfahrung, aber auch unterschiedliche erste Vorstellungen wie denn solche Spiele zum Gegenstand historischer, geschichtskultureller und fachdidaktischer Forschung, Erkundung und Entwicklung werden können, machen einen wesentlichen Reiz des Lehrprojekts aus, geht es doch – gerade auch angesichts der rasanten Taktung neuer technischer und medialer Möglichkeiten und neuer Entwicklungen einzelner Spiele – nicht darum, eine gewissermaßen über viele Jahre hinweg erarbeitete und gesättigt vorliegende Theorie und Methodik einfach den Studierenden zu vermitteln, sondern vielmehr anhand einer Auswahl mehr oder weniger aktueller Spiele gemeinsam Kategorien und Kriterien für eine Analyse (bzw. De-Konstruktion) zu entwickeln (wobei auf umfangreiche Vorarbeiten von Nico Nolden in seiner Dissertation zurückgegriffen werden kann; vgl. Nolden 2018a; vgl. auch Nolden 2018b) und diese Ergebnisse und eigenen Einsichten zu nutzen für die Entwicklung didaktischer Konzepte, welche die Befähigung von jugendlichen Lernenden zur reflektierten und reflexiven Auseinandersetzung mit solchen Spielen und ihrer Bedeutung für das eigene Verständnis von Geschichte zum Ziel haben. Neben den von Daniel Giere im letzten Teil des ersten Seminars einzubringenden didaktischen Ansätzen liegen hierfür mit den Konzepten des reflektierten und selbst-reflexiven Geschichtsbewusstseins sowie der Kompetenzen Historischen Denkens der FUER-Gruppe (Körber et al. 2007) Grundlagen vor. Ob und wie diese jeweils für konkrete, auf einzelne Spiele und konkrete Lerngruppen ausgerichtete Unterrichtskonzepte und wiederum für allgemeine didaktische Handreichungen genutzt werden können oder aber ggf. adaptiert und ggf. ergänzt werden müssen, wird Gegenstand der Arbeit im zweiten Projektsemester sein.

Auch hier können (und sollen) die Praktikums-Tandems aus Lehramtsstudierenden einerseits und die Tandems aus Fachwissenschafts-Studierenden sich ergänzen, etwa indem letztere – ggf. auf der Basis von Beobachtungen, Einzel- und Gruppeninterviews mit jugendlichen Spieler*innen, Lehrpersonen, aber auch ggf. anderen Beteiligten (Autor*innen, Kritiker*innen etc.) – weitere Analysen der medialen und performativen Konstruktion von Sinn erarbeiten, die wiederum in didaktische Handreichungen eingehen können.

Was interessiert(e) unsere Studierenden zu Beginn des Projekts?

Die in gemischten Tandems (aber getrennt nach interessierenden Spielen) aufgrund erster eigener Exploration entwickelten ersten Zugriffe, Frage- und Problemstellungen lassen vornehmlich zwei Aspekte erkennen: (1) Die Frage nach der „Authentizität“ digitaler Spiele und (2) die Entwicklung konkreten Unterrichtshandelns u.a. mit der Idee Perspektivität als Analysedimension zu erproben. Mögen diese Zugriffe und Problemdimensionen auch zunächst noch sehr unterschiedlich wirken und als eher getrennt voneinander zu bearbeiten erscheinen, so lässt sich doch erwarten, dass sie sich in wohl kurzer Zeit als eng aufeinander verwiesen und miteinander verflochten erweisen werden.

Im Folgenden sollen einige mit dem historischen Denken und Lernen zusammenhängende Problemfelder (digitalen) historischen Spielens beleuchtet werden, die für deren Analyse und unterrichtliche Thematisierung relevant werden können, die aber durch weitere, im Projekt von den Studierenden zu entwickelnde oder aber empirisch herauszuarbeitende Aspekte ergänzt und modifiziert werden können (und müssen). Denn auch darum wird es in unserem Lehrprojekt gehen, dass nicht einfach vorhandene Einsichten und Konzepte „umgesetzt“ werden, sondern dass Geschichtsstudierende mit und ohne das Studienziel Lehramt gemeinsam diesen Komplex medialen Bezugs auf die Vergangenheit gemeinsamen explorativ erforschen.

Zu 1: Authentizität versus Plausibilität

Nicht verwunderlich war, dass die Frage der „Authentizität“ der Spiele einen relativ großen Stellenwert einnahm. In welchem Verhältnis dabei ein Verständnis von „Authentizität“ im Sinne einer „korrekten Abbildung“ der wirklichen Vergangenheit zu weiteren denkbaren Aspekten und Dimensionen bzw. gar Verständnissen von „Authentizität“ steht, wird im weiteren zu thematisieren und zu diskutieren sein. Schon bei klassischen Medien der Historie ist die Vorstellung einer mehr oder weniger gelingenden „Abbildung“ oder Repräsentation der vergangenen Realität problematisch, insofern sie die spezifische, durch zeitliche, soziale, kulturelle, politische und weitere Positionalitäten, aber auch Interessen, Fragehaltungen und schließlich persönliche Vorlieben, der jeweiligen Autor*innen geprägte Perspektivität und die Bindung jeder Darstellung an den (wie auch immer reflektierten) Verstehenshorizont der Erzählzeit verkennt. Neben die Plausibilität des Erfahrungsgehalts („empirische Triftigkeit“) müssen als Kriterien der Qualität historischer Darstellungen und Aussagen somit schon immer diejenigen der normativen Triftigkeit (also der Relevanz-, Werte- und Normenhorizonte) und der narrativen Triftigkeit(en) sowie ggf. der Plausibilität der darin angehenden Konzepte und Theorien („theoretische Plausibilität“ nach Rüsen 2013) treten, die allesamt nicht einfach in einem binären (gegeben-nicht gegeben) Modus oder als einfache Ausprägungsskala zu denken sind, sondern über die Grade der intersubjektiv nachvollziehbaren Begründung und somit den Grad des expliziten Einbezugs möglicher Einwände gegen die empirische Grundlage, die Perspektiven und Werte sowie die Konstruktion der Erzählung operationalisiert werden müssen.

Rezipient(en) als Ko-Konstrukteur(e) historischer Narrationen

All dies gilt auch für andere interaktive und performative Formen der „Vergegenwärtigung“ von Geschichte. Hinzu kommt für digitale Spiele jedoch die deutlich größere „Rolle“ der Rezipienten für die Entstehung einer historischen Narration. Selbst bei den klassischen Medien (Buch, Film) ist nicht davon auszugehen, dass eine „im Material angelegte“ Narration 1:1 von jeder/m Rezipienten identisch „wahrgenommen“ wird, sondern vielmehr, dass die Rezeption selbst ein aktiver Vorgang ist, der wesentlichen Anteil an der Konstruktion einer historischen Sinnbildung ist.

Selbst klassische performative Medien wie etwa ein (Geschichts-)Theater oder Vortrag, die nach dem Moment der Wahrnehmung nicht mehr in derselben Form vorliegen (also „flüchtig“ sind), haben zumeist eine weitgehend festgelegte, für alle Rezipienten gemeinsam gültige Form. Dies ist bei interaktiven Medien wie Spielen anders. Hier haben die Spielenden selbst einen erheblichen Einfluss auf die konkrete Form des ihnen entgegentretenden narrativen Angebots, das sie nicht nur im Wege der Rezeption, sondern ebenso der Interaktion zu ihrer eigenen Sinnbildung „verarbeiten“ müssen. Während es bei den klassischen Geschichtsmedien nicht-flüchtiger wie auch (auf der Basis verschriftlichter Vorlagen oder auch nachträglicher Dokumentation) weitgehend möglich ist, die „Angebots“-Seite (d.h. die Darstellung) als solche zu analysieren („de-konstruieren“) auf ihren Erfahrungsgehalt, die in (an?) ihnen erkennbaren Konzepte, Relevanzaussagen, Werte und Normen sowie Erklärungsmuster der Autor*innen, erlauben interaktive Spiele zumindest ideell eine unendliche und im Vorhinein kaum bestimmbare Variation an Verläufen und damit Narrationen. Jegliche Analysen (De-Konstruktionen) müssen somit mindestens zwei Ebenen trennen, nämlich (1) die „von außen“ nicht konkret erkennbare Tiefendimension der in die Spielregeln bzw. Algorithmen auf der Basis von „Vergangenheitspartikeln“, Normen und narrativen Konzepten einprogrammierten Entscheidungs- und Varianzstellen und der dadurch möglichen potentiellen Narrative, sowie die in der Interaktion mit den (ggf. mehreren!) Spielenden entstehenden aktualisierten Narrative.

Letztere entstehen ggf. auch bei völlig zufälligem, keinem konkreten Muster oder einer Strategie folgenden Agieren der Spielenden, werden aber zumeist mit – nicht aber allein – bestimmt sein durch ihre eigenen Perspektiven, ihre Horizonte an Wert-, Norm- und Zusammenhangsüberzeugungen und ihrer Geschichtsbilder (wie auch immer bewusst sie sind). Sie sind somit abhängig von Ausprägungen des Geschichtsbewusstseins sowie Prozessen des historischen Denkens und beeinflussen ihrerseits beide (vgl. Körber 2018).

Didaktische Relevanz digitaler Spiele

Damit sind historische Spiele als performativ-interaktive Geschichtssorten hochgradig didaktisch relevant. Nicht nur insofern die von ihnen in Form einprogrammierter potentieller Narrative angebotenen1 Ausprägungen von Geschichtsbewusstsein, konkrete Geschichtsbilder und Kenntnisse sowohl bestätigen und ggf. differenzieren und erweitern können, sondern auch ihnen widersprechen, sie herausfordern und konterkarieren, bedürfen sowohl die Rezeption (oder besser: Nutzung) als auch die Kommunikation über Spielerfahrungen und Herausforderungen selbst historischer Kenntnisse, kategorialen Wissens und der Fähigkeit zur De und Re-Konstruktion, sondern gerade auch, insofern der interaktive performative Prozess jeweils neue Narrative und Bilder in einer sonst kaum erfahrbaren Geschlossenheit und Dynamik produziert. Wo klassische Medien der Geschichte entweder per wiederholter Rezeption entweder des Originals (erneute Lektüre) oder aber einer Dokumentation in einiger Tiefe und Genauigkeit analysiert und de-konstruiert werden können, bevor man sich zu ihnen verhalten muss, erzeugt die Interaktivität des Spielens die Notwendigkeit von Analysen der jeweils emergenten Situationen in actu – einschließlich ihrer Einbettung in das emergente Narrativ und in das Geschichtsbild und -verständnis der/des Spielenden. Die eigene Aktivität selbst im Reagieren auf konkrete Situationen kann dabei ggf. zu einer Form der Beglaubigung sowohl der wahrgenommenen Einzelheiten und Situationen als auch der tieferliegenden Logiken des Handelns werden.

Analysen historischer Spielen, die nicht nur die Präsentations- (bzw. Angebots-)Seite in den Blick nehmen, sondern die bei den Spielenden wirksam werdenden Prozesse des historischen Denkens (ebenso) berücksichtigen wollen, müssen somit über die Analyse einzelner konkreter aktualisierter Narrative hinaus die darunter liegenden, in der Anlage des Spiels, dem Regelwerk bzw. der Programmierung und den in sie eingegangenen Konzepten, Handlungsmöglichkeiten etc. erkennbaren potentiellen Narrationen ebenso in den Blick nehmen wie die in der Interaktion mit den Spielhandlungen emergenten Prozesse historischen Denkens der Spielenden. Zu analysieren sind somit nicht nur materiale Erzählungen medialer Art, sondern wesentlich auch performative Prozesse des historischen Denkens.
Hieraus lässt sich fragen, inwiefern die Nutzung von interaktiven historischen Spielen gleichzeitig Chancen für historisches Lernen bietet (und in welcher Form), und inwiefern es auf bestimmte (ggf. gegenüber herkömmlichen Konzepten veränderte) Ausprägungen historischer Kompetenzen angewiesen ist (und wie beide miteinander interagieren).

Zu 2: Wie kann nun Schule und schulischer Geschichtsunterricht dazu beitragen?

Auch wenn digitale historische Spiele ein noch recht junges Untersuchungsfeld der Geschichtsdidaktik darstellen (früh: Grosch 2002; Bender 2012; Kühberger 2013), gibt es bereits eine Reihe von Unterrichtskonzepten (z.B. Giere 2018). Auch in den Gruppen unseres Seminars wurden in einem ersten Schritt unterrichtspragmatische Ansätze thematisiert.

Dass mit dem Spielen fiktionaler Spiele direkt valides Wissen über vergangene Realität gewonnen werden kann, mag vielen mit Konzepten des historischen Lernens Vertrauten einigermaßen naiv erscheinen. Dennoch ist die Vorstellung keineswegs aus der Welt, wie – sowohl zu Werbezwecken behauptet, aber auch in Schilderungen von Spielerfahrungen zu finden – das Beispiel der Explorer-Funktion der neueren Versionen von Assassins Creed zeigt. Außerhalb kriegerischer Spielhandlungen ermögliche das Spiel seinen Nutzern, die vergangene Welt (konkret: Ägyptens) zu erkunden und zu erfahren, wie es damals war.2

Die frühen Unterrichtsvorstellungen unserer Studierenden gehen deutlich andere Wege. Im Vordergrund steht die Vorstellung einer eher kontrastiven Positionierung von Spielerfahrung und „Realgeschichte“, sei es im Sinne der Einwicklung von Fragestellungen zur spielexternen Geschichte aufgrund spielinterner Erfahrungen oder durch explizite Vergleiche – etwa durch Kontrastierung mit wiederum spielexternen Quellen und Darstellungen.

In den Grobkonzepten der Gruppen tauchten immer wieder viele konkret unterrichtspragmatische Vorschläge zum Umgang mit digitalen Spielen auf. Genannt wurden die gemeinsame Entwicklung von Fragestellungen, die Kontrastierung von Spielszenen mit historischen Fotos und/oder Quellen. Daran schließt sich die Frage der Zielperspektive von Geschichtsunterricht an. Welche Funktion haben all diese Vorschläge für historisches Lernen und was verstehen wir überhaupt darunter?

Diskutiert wurde in diesem Zusammenhang die Rolle von Wissenserwerb über „die“ Vergangenheit durch digitale Spiele. Überdies wurden die Teilnehmer*innen konfrontiert mit der Vorstellung eines Aufbaus von Kompetenzen historischen Denkens mit dem Ziel der Entwicklung und Erweiterung eines reflexiven und (selbst)reflexiven Geschichtsbewusstseins (Schreiber 2002; Körber et al. 2007). Für digitale Spiele wurde die Frage diskutiert, inwiefern die dichotomische Vorstellung einer „Zwei-Welten-Lehre“ zur weiteren Erforschung sinnvoll sein könnte (dazu Körber 2018).

Die spielerfahrenen Teilnehmer*innen konnten hier wertvolle Impulse liefern. So berichtete eine Studentin von spielinternen Kontingenzsituationen. Inwiefern diese durch historisches Denken innerhalb des Spiels bewältigt werden können, wäre beispielsweise ein Forschungsprojekt. Ob spiel-externes Wissen – hier: zu den europäischen Bündnissystemen – innerhalb von digitalen Spielen erfolgreich genutzt werden kann, wurde ebenfalls diskutiert. Ein anderer studentischer Beitrag stellte eigene spielerische Zeiterfahrungen in den Mittelpunkt: In einem Strategiespiel war ein (selbst aufgebautes) mächtiges Reich plötzlich untergegangen. Der Spieler hatte jetzt die Idee, in der Zeit – das war durch die Spielmechanik erlaubt – zurück zu reisen, um die Ursachen für diesen Niedergang zu ergründen und möglicherweise die Spielvergangenheit entsprechend zu manipulieren. Für die Umsetzung im Geschichtsunterricht vertrat eine größere Gruppe die Ansicht, es müsse aufgrund unserer Diskussion nach Möglichkeiten gesucht werden, Spielerfahrung(en) selbst zum Reflexionsgegenstand zu machen. Vielleicht müssen dazu Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung (z.B. nachträgliches lautes Denken) zumindest in einer pragmatischen Form Einzug in den Geschichtsunterricht erhalten.

Multiperspektivität

Als Qualitätskriterium und zur Einschätzung der Eignung eines digitalen Spiels für den Geschichtsunterricht bietet sich – zumindest auf den ersten Blick – die Berücksichtigung unterschiedlicher Perspektiven im vergangenen Geschehen an. Dies war auch von unseren Studierenden früh formuliert worden. Indem interaktive Spiele es ermöglichen, Rollen zu wechseln, werde die Mono-(retro-)Perspektivität des traditionellen Master-Narrativs und vieler klassischer Texte durchbrochen. Wenn (und insofern) Spiele es dabei nicht nur erlauben, unterschiedliche, aber letztlich kaum unterschiedene Individuen zu verkörpern, sondern in sozial, politisch, kulturell oder auch geschlechtlich unterschiedliche Rollen zu schlüpfen, wäre damit zumindest in fiktionaler, hypothetischer Ausprägung eine wesentliche Forderung geschichtsdidaktischer Präsentation und /oder Inszenierung erfüllt. So können zumindest potentiell unterschiedliche zeittypische Wahrnehmungen und Interessen in Bezug auf ein gleiches (gespieltes) Ereignis simuliert und über ihre Unterschiedlichkeit diskutiert werden. Wenn diese unterschiedlichen Rollen und Perspektiven mittels perspektivischer Quellentexte (bzw. auf ihnen basierender Derivate) charakterisiert werden, ist Multiperspektivität im engeren Sinne, zumindest ansatzweise gegeben. Wo dies aufgrund mangelnder Quellenverfügbarkeit nicht der Fall ist, könnte man versucht sein, die auf Klaus Bergmann zurückgehende Forderung, auch die Perspektive der „stummen Gruppen“ der Vergangenheit zu berücksichtigen, erfüllt zu sehen.3

Inwiefern die Kriterien der Multiperspektivität aber wirklich oder nur vermeintlich als erfüllt gelten können, bzw. – gerade auch dem Nutzer – ein falscher Eindruck diesbezüglich vermittelt wird, bedarf jeweils der theoretischen Reflexion4 wie einer genauen Analyse der konkreten Spiele. Hierzu ist etwa zu analysieren,

  • inwiefern die Charakteristika der wähl- und wechselbaren Rollen mit sowohl triftigen als auch für die/den Spieler*in erkennbaren historischen Informationen „belegt“ bzw. gestützt sind,
  • inwiefern das Spiel nicht nur das Erfüllen einer Verhaltensvorgabe in einer prototypischen Situation erfordert oder aber dazu beiträgt, dass Strukturen und Abläufe historischer Situationen aus einer rollen-spezifischen Perspektive aus zu beurteilen sind,
  • und andere Aspekte mehr.

Darauf aufbauend bedarf darf die Einschätzung, inwiefern etwaige Möglichkeiten einer Rollenübernahme bzw. die Präsentation unterschiedlicher Figuren in Spielen auch zur multiperspektivischen Präsentation von Vergangenheit und zur unterrichtlichen Reflexion geeignet sind, weiterer didaktischer Überlegungen. Zu reflektieren ist jeweils allgemein und auf ein konkretes Spiel bezogen,

  • (wie) (ein) Spiel(e) so eingesetzt werden kann/können, dass Schüler*innen nicht fraglos (immersiv) in eine Perspektive hineingestellt werden und in ihr verbleiben, sondern dass es ihnen möglich wird, den Konstruktcharakter nicht nur der Geschichte an sich, sondern der Perspektive (= Position + Interessen, Handlungsoptionen) selbst zu erkennen und zu reflektieren,
  • (wie) in einem unterrichtlichen Zusammenhang sichtbar und diskutierbar gemacht werden kann, ob bzw. inwiefern Schüler*innen diese retrospektive, auf einem Geschichtsbild basierende Ausgestaltung ihrer „Rolle“ bewusst wird, und wie ihnen Einsichten dazu ermöglicht werden können,
  • welche Irritationen und Einsichten sowie Fragen an das Medium „Spiel“ und seine Bedeutung bei Schüler*innen angestoßen werden und welche Bedeutung deren Reaktionen für a) die Theoriebildung über und Evaluation von Spielen als Geschichtssorte und b) die Entwicklung schulischen Geschichtsunterrichts als einer Instanz haben, die zu kritischem reflektiertem Umgang mit der Geschichtskultur befähigt.
Historische Spiele nur etwas für „Zocker-Schüler*innen“?

Unterrichtskonzepte, die diese Fragen zum Ausgangspunkt von Didaktisierung und Operationalisierung machen, setzen keineswegs voraus, dass Schüler*innen im Unterricht (oder häuslich zur Vorbereitung) extensiv spielen. Dies wird einerseits aufgrund unterschiedlicher häuslicher und auch schulischer Ausstattung nicht immer möglich sein, in manchen Fällen auch wegen Bedenken von Eltern oder aufgrund nicht immer jugendfreien Charakters der Spiele. Zudem dürfte die Komplexität vieler Spiele jegliche Vorstellung einer Thematisierung in toto von vornherein ausschließen. Es wird also schon aus pragmatischen und organisatorischen Gründen erforderlich sein, auszuwählen, zu fokussieren und ggf. auch Materialien über solche Spiele bzw. solche, welche Spiele und Spielverläufe dokumentieren, einzusetzen an Stelle des ganzen Spiels selbst. Dies ist aber auch aus didaktischen Gründen sinnvoll.

Unterrichtliche Nutzung von Geschichtssorten soll ja weder diese Geschichtssorten selbst unterrichten noch sie als einfaches Medium zur Vermittlung von Fachwissen einsetzen, sondern sie selbst zum Gegenstand machen. Das beinhaltet überdies, dass weder eine Affinität zu solchen Spielen Bedingung für die unterrichtliche Beschäftigung mit ihnen sein kann noch eine persönliche (oder häusliche) Distanz zu diesen Medien ein Grund für eines Dispens darstellt. Digitale historische Spiele als Medien der heutigen Geschichtskultur müssen ebenso im Unterricht thematisiert werden können wie beispielsweise Denkmäler, Museen und Filme.

Mögliche Umsetzung im Geschichtsunterricht

Einige – zunächst noch theoretische – Möglichkeiten seien skizziert:

  • Zwei kontrastive Spielverläufe vergleichbarer („gleicher“) Szenen werden als (Video-)Protokoll vorgelegt und die entstehenden unterschiedlichen Narrationen verglichen sowie die Rolle der jeweils getroffenen Entscheidungen für diese unterschiedlichen Darstellungen diskutiert und reflektiert.
  • Bei Spielen, in deren Verlauf jeweils mehrere unterschiedliche Entscheidungen zu treffen sind, spielt eine mit mehreren Computern ausgestattete Gruppe an eine Reihe solcher Entscheidungen jeweils in Gruppen unterschiedlich durch und erzählt im Anschluss (nach mehreren solcher Entscheidungen) die unterschiedlichen Verläufe nach, so dass die Bedeutung der „agency“ der Spielfigur für das entstehende Narrativ sichtbar wird.
  • Eigene und fremde Spielerfahrungen von Schülerinnen und Schülern werden zum Gegenstand der Reflexion gemacht.
  • Schüler*innen können ausgewählte Szenen einzelner Spiele selbst spielen und ihre eigene (in geeigneter Form gesicherte) Erfahrung sowie die dabei entstandenen eigenen Fragen anschließend mit zuvor erhobenen Protokollen anderer Spieler*innen vergleichend auswerten. Hierzu eignen sich ggf. Protokolle in actu oder nachträglich stattfindenden lauten Denkens (stimulated recall; vgl. Messmer 2015, s. auch Lenz und Talsnes 2014).
  • Wenn die Möglichkeit eigenen Spielens mit Dokumentation im Unterricht nicht oder nur in geringem Umfang gegeben ist, können auch (ggf. nur kurze, ein „look and feel“ vermittelnden eigenen Spielens oder der Vorführung eines ausgewählten Spielverlaufs) möglichst unterschiedliche (visuelle und textlich vorliegende) Spielprotokolle vergleichend ausgewertet werden.

Bei all diesen Methoden wird es darauf ankommen, dass nicht einfach Fragen des Gelingens/des Spielerfolgs im Mittelpunkt stehen, sondern die Wahrnehmungen der gestalteten Spielsituation, der ggf. von der/dem Spielenden verlangten Entscheidungen und ihres Verhältnisses zu ihrem Geschichtsbild (der Vorstellung von der jeweiligen Vergangenheit) und zu ihrem Geschichtsbewusstsein ankommen. Zu letzterem gehören etwa die (ggf. noch eher unbewussten) Vorstellungen davon, inwiefern „damaliges“ Handeln und die zugehörige Moral sich von heutigen unterscheiden, die bei Schüler*innen gegebenen Vorstellungen von Macht, Herrschaft, Gewalt, Gut und Böse, aber auch ihre Überlegungen zu Authentizität und Triftigkeit der jeweils präsentierten Geschichte.

Was ist eigentlich „Geschichte“?

Somit werden nicht nur konkrete Spiele und Spielszenen sowie spiel-immanentes Handeln thematisch für Geschichtsunterricht. Er muss vielmehr auch das Augenmerk auf die Vorstellungen und Begriffe der Schüler*innen davon richten, was Geschichte, welche Funktion und Bedeutung sie für die Gesellschaft allgemein sowie für sie als Individuen besitzt – und über die Rolle historischer Spiele als „Geschichtssorte“ im geschichtskulturellen Gefüge.

Inwiefern etwa nehmen Schüler*innen die Darstellung von Geschichte in solchen Spielen und die in der Gesellschaft und Schule sonst verhandelte Geschichte als zusammengehörig oder aber als deutlich voneinander getrennt wahr? Inwiefern werden die solche Spiele strukturierenden Welten überhaupt als einer auch außerhalb dieser Spielwelt gegebenen Vergangenheit zugehörig (und somit als „historisch“) wahrgenommen – oder aber als eine reine Folie, die mit der Vergangenheit letztlich nichts zu tun hat? Inwiefern sind ihnen mögliche oder tatsächlich Einflüsse der ihnen in Spielen begegnenden Geschichtsdarstellungen auf ihr eigenes Geschichtsbild und -bewusstsein gar nicht, ansatzweise oder (zunehmend?) deutlich bewusst?

Inwiefern besitzen bzw. erwerben Schüler*innen einen kritischen Blick auf die Art und Weise, wie Vergangenes in solchen Spielen konstruiert und gestaltet ist?

Fazit

Natürlich wird unser kombiniertes Projektseminar weder alle hier noch alle in Nico Noldens jüngstem fachbezogenen Eintrag im Blog „gespielt“ des Arbeitskreises Geschichtswissenschaft und digitale Spiele (https://gespielt.hypotheses.org/). (Nolden 2018b) angesprochenen theoretischen Fragen in Bezug auf digitale historische Spiele als Geschichtssorte in Gänze bearbeiten können; noch werden alle denkbaren unterrichtspragmatischen Ansätze für eine kompetenz- und reflexionsorientierte Thematisierung in schulischem Geschichtsunterricht umgesetzt werden können. Es wird aber schon ein deutlicher Erfolg sein, wenn (auch über die bei Nico Nolden sowie in diesem Beitrag angerissenen Aspekte hinaus) sowohl die Beschäftigung der Lehramts- wie der Fachstudierenden mit den Spielen als auch ihre Erfahrungen und Erkundungen im Umfeld konkreter Unterrichtsversuche dazu führen, dass eine Reihe von Einsichten sowohl in die historiographischen und medialen Logiken der Geschichtspräsentation in dieser Geschichtssorte, in Formen performativer Sinnbildungen (einschließlich Irritationen und neu entstehender Fragen) und Möglichkeiten ihrer pragmatischen Fokussierung entwickelt werden.

Literatur

  1. Analog zu anderen Bereichen könnte man auch die von Spiel-Hard- und v.a. Software gebotenen Narrative als „Angebote“ begreifen. Ähnlich wie bei Unterricht (vgl. Seidel 2014) stellen diese aber nicht einfach alternativ zu „nutzende“, vollständig ausgeprägte Varianten (dort: von Lernprozessen, hier historischer Narrative) dar, sondern vielmehr „Proto-Formen“ bzw. potentielle Narrative, die erst durch die (Inter-)Aktion der Spielenden zu vollständigen Verläufen werden, wobei unterschiedliche Narrative gewissermaßen emergieren. []
  2. Selbst wenn etwa der Creative Director des Spiels, Jean Guesdon, betont, dass Spiel sei „kein Ersatz für Geschichtsunterricht oder Lehre“, versteht er die Darstellung doch als geeignetes „Anschauungsmaterial“; vgl. Kreienbrink 2018. []
  3. Vgl. „Es besteht in der Geschichtsdidaktik weitestgehender Konsens darüber, dass auch das Leben und Wirken anderer sozialer Gruppen als der Herrscherelite im Geschichtsunterricht thematisiert werden muss, und dass auch geschichtlich ‘stumme’ Gruppen in ihm zum Sprechen zu bringen sind. Damit werden in der Didaktik Gruppen bezeichnet, von denen aus den verschiedensten Gründen keine oder wenig Zeugnisse überliefert worden sind: Bauern früherer Zeiten etwa, die nicht schreiben konnten, Frauen früherer Zeiten, die als nicht wichtig genug angesehen wurden, dass sie in der Geschichtsschreibung vorkamen, Verlierer großer Kriege, über die nur der Gewinner berichtete, und dann wiederum fast nur Negatives, und so weiter.“ (Stello 2016, S. 282). []
  4. Das betrifft etwa die Frage, inwiefern die Perspektiven von Gruppe ohne eigene Überlieferung überhaupt ähnlich solcher mit Überlieferung eingenommen werden können oder ob dies notwendigerweise gegenwärtigen Perspektiven und Konzepten ebenso wie Fremdwahrnehmungen anderer Gruppen verhaftet bleibende Spekulation bleiben muss. Andererseits ist die Frage zu stellen, ob sich diese Herausforderung wirklich prinzipiell oder nur graduell von anderen historischen Rekonstruktionsprozessen unterscheidet. []

Analyzing Monuments using crosstabulations of Historical Thinking Competencies and Types of Narrating

Körber, Andreas (2018): „Analyzing Monuments using crosstabulations of Historical Thinking Competencies and Types of Narrating.“ In: Historisch Denken Lernen. Arbeitsbereich Geschichtsdidaktik der Universität Hamburg. 16.10.2018.

The following is a follow-up in the discussion on Stéphane Lévesques model of historical competencies as presented in Public History Weekly, a few days ago, titled „Removing the ‚Past‘: Debates Over Official Sites of Memory“1 and my first extended comment on this published here on this blog.

A crosstabulation of competencies and patterns/logic of sensemaking like Stéphane Lévesque suggested2 is indeed useful for „reading“ individual monuments and making sense of their „message“, also. Stéphane’s filling of the table is a bit abstracht, general for this, so the following would in part be my own understanding.

It also is based on Rüsen’s notion that while the different patterns were developed sequentially over time, to „older“ ones are not lost, but still available and indeed visible in modern day thinking, in fact most of the time in combinations. What characterizes modern-time historical thinking, then, is the presence and dominance of „genetic“ thinking, while pre-modern thought would not have this type at its disposal at all. But then, our examples here are all „modern“, so that it may be a question of dominance and relative weight.

Take a monument for a civil war general:

  • A spectator today may read it as a reminder to the origin of the current state of affairs, possibly the „losing of the cause“ (e.g. both the honoured general and the spectator being southeners) or to the liberation of the slaves (both northeners). In both cases, the monument would be seen as pointing to an origin of what is seen as valid today (the very definition of Rüsen’s „traditional“ type). This might explain why people adhering to the northern narrative would oppose to southern monuments, and vice versa, not believeing their story in the first place — and maybe fearing that keeping the monuments would signify that their version was to be seen as valid.
  • In an exemplaric mode, however, both may accept the „other side’s“ monuments, because what they point at would not be seen as the origin of affairs, but rather a general rule, e.g. honouring people „bravely fighting for their respective (!) cause“. The logic would be that each society would honor „their heroes“, who do not so much stand for the specific cause but for a general rule. What happens on the ground in Gettysburg, e.g., is something along this line: „Traditional“ commemorating attracts most people going there, but an exemplary „cover-narrative“ allows for common remembrance.

Consider an example from Hamburg, where I work 3: On our „Rathausmarkt“, there is a monument, honouring Hamburg’s dead from WW1. When it was erected in 1932, it looked as it does today. The inscription on one side reads „fourty thousand sons of town left their lives for you“ (in German: „Vierzig Tausend Söhne der Stadt ließen ihr Leben für Euch“) and a relief of a woman (mother) and child (daughter) apparently comforting each other in mourning (and therefore reminiscent of a pietà) by Ernst Barlach on the other side.

Ernst Barlach: Relief (1931; Re-construction) auf dem Mahnmal auf dem Hamburger Rathausmarkt. Foto von Wikimedia Commons (gemeinfrei): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/Hamburg_Mahnmal_01_KMJ-adj.jpg
Ernst Barlach: Relief (Pietà; 1931; Re-construction) auf dem Mahnmal auf dem Hamburger Rathausmarkt. Foto von Wikimedia Commons (gemeinfrei): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/Hamburg_Mahnmal_01_KMJ-adj.jpg

In 1938, the relief was exchanged for an eagle flying up.4 

Hans-Martin Ruwoldt (1938): Adler auf dem Hamburger Ehrenmal am Rathausmarkt. Foto von https://www.denk-mal-gegen-krieg.de/kriegerdenkmaeler/hamburg-lo-os/

Did the form of commemoration, the valuing of the 40000 Hamburgians, change? I do think so.

Already the addition of „for you“ as a concession to the right parties changes a more traditional message into a more exemplary one, which is made prominent by the exchange of the relief: It is even more possible, because what are two different concepts and terms in English language, share a common word in German: „Opfer“:

Despite the active voice of the inscription and in spite of the (added) „for you“, the mother and daugther-relief marks the dead soldiers rather as victims of a greater context of war, to be mourned, their rather „tragic“ deaths and loss as the origin or our common grief, and therefore seems to incorporate elements of a new kind of monuments, developed in WW1, which do no longer provide, but rather question the meaning of the deaths.5 The eagle (or „phoenix“ as the sculptor Hans Martin Ruwoldt was commissioned), however, eradicated this (thin on not exclusive) layer of questionsing, and renders the 40.000 exemplaric „sacrifices“ – heroes to be emulated, celebrated.6.
In 1948, the lost Barlach-relief, was restored, alas not by Barlach himself, who had died meanwhile.

I do have a hard time constructing a genetic understanding of such a monument, maybe because a modern, genetic way of thinking needs to have been informed by the „critical“ mode of at least partly de-legitimizing the orientating power of traditional and exemplaric thinking.

Maybe this is the background for modern monuments being quite different, either often non-figurative — as Peter Eisenman’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews in Berlin, or many works by Jochen Gerz7 — or taking on forms of counter-memorialization8, thus setting in motion a kind of change, not just re-present-ing a past, but encouraging or even enforcing critical reflection on it.

It is easier for the Hamburg monument: Genetic thinking would question whether not only this heroifying way of commemorating heroes (even if not individual), but also the concrete form of public acknowledging of tragic loss can be timely, after we experienced another war and an inhuman dictatorship and genocide which was not least based on feelings instigated by such commemorating.9

But there is something more to reflecting about narratives — and especially on how to relate to them. As I wrote above, Memorials are narratives. Rüsen calls them „narrative abbreviations“, pointing to them standing for a specific narrative, i.e. a specific relation between a past (under memory), the present (of the authors and erectors of the monument as well as the intended public), and with regard to a specific future, constructed only partly in verbal narrative form, but also with non-verbal and sequentially narrative elements (even though in some cases it is only the verbal inscriptions which really hint to any historical meaning).

Memorials are more than only proto-narratives. Their (often) prominent (albeit also often overlooked) positioning, their (proto-)narrative structure and their own quality for lasting a long time (cf. „monumentum exegi aere perennius), they do not only constitute a narrative relation from one temporal and social position towrds the past and the future, but also are meant to prolong the sense they make and to impose it on later generations. Monuments are about obligating their audience, the spectators with a certain narrative and interpretation. That qualifies them as parts of what we call „politics of history“, not only of commemoration, and what makes them political.

It therefore is paramount to read monuments as narratives, and not only in the de-constructive sense of „what did those erectors make of that past back then“, but also in the re-conctructive sense of „in how far or how does this narrative fit into my/our relation to that past). In other words: Standing before a monument and thinking about monuments, we all need to (and in fact do) think in a combination of understanding the others‘ and deliberating our own narrative meaning-making.
Therefore we need to read them as narratives first, and become competent for it.

Monuments often take on the form of addressing people. Sometimes — as in the Hamburg case above — they address the spectator, reminding them of some kind of obligation to commemorate.10 But who is talking to whom? If the senate of Hamburg talkes to that to the Hamburg citizens of 1930-1932, can/will we accept that (a) the Hamburg Senate of today still admonishes us like that, and b) that we Hamburg citizens of today are still addressed in the same way?

In other cases, (inscriptions in) memorials might explicitly address the commemorated themselves, as e.g. in the confederate monument in Yanceyville, N.C., whose plaque reads „To the Sons of Caswell County who served in the War of 1861-1865 in answer to the Call of their County“, and continues in a „We-Voice“, signed by the Caswell Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy“. So far so conventional. This might be rather unproblematic, since speaker-position and addressees are clearly marked. One might leave the monument even if one disagreed, not having to align with its narrative. Only if the presence of such commemorating in itself is inacceptable, action is immediately called for.

But there are other monuments which seem to talk from a neutral position, which in fact is that of the erectors, but by not being qualified, includes the spectator into the speaker position. The example I have ready at hand, is not from the US and not about war heroes, but again from Hamburg, this time from Neuengamme concentration camp memorial. In 1965, an „international monument“ stele11 was erected there, together with a whole series of country-specific memorial plates. The inscription on the monument reads „Your suffering, your fighting and your death shall not be in vain“ (my translation).
This now clearly is interesting in at least two respects: (1) it ascribes not only suffering and death, but also fighting to those commemorated and thereby possibly does not refer to those inmates who never had a chance or did not „fight“, who were pure victims, and (2) it speaks from a neutral voice which is not marked in time and social, political or event-related position. Whoever mourns at that place possibly silently co-signs the statement.

International Monument (1965) at Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial (partial photo; (c) 2006 Andreas Körber)
International Monument (1965) at Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial (partial photo; (c) 2006 Andreas Körber)

Consider an equal honouring of confederate generals in, say NC: „Your fighting shall not have been in vain.“ I would spark much more controversy and concers — and rightly so.

Still another example, the first Hamburg monument for the victims of National Socialism (from late 1945) on the Central Cemetry in Hamburg-Ohlsdorf, has an inscription „Injustice brought Us Death — Living: Recognize your Obligation“.

Erstes Hamburger Mahnmal für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus von 11/1945 in Hamburg Ohlsdorf. Foto von NordNordWest/Wikipedia. Lizenz: CC-BY-SA 3.0; (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/de/legalcode); Original: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mahnmal_Opfer_der_NS-Verfolgung_Ohlsdorf.jpg
Erstes Hamburger Mahnmal für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus von 11/1945 in Hamburg Ohlsdorf. Foto von NordNordWest/Wikipedia. Lizenz: CC-BY-SA 3.0; (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/de/legalcode); Original: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mahnmal_Opfer_der_NS-Verfolgung_Ohlsdorf.jpg

 

Erstes Hamburger Mahnmal für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus von 11/1945 in Hamburg Ohlsdorf; Detail. Zustand 25.3.2010; Foto (c) Andreas Körber
Erstes Hamburger Mahnmal für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus von 11/1945 in Hamburg Ohlsdorf; Detail. Zustand 25.3.2010; Foto (c) Andreas Körber

 

Again, for analyzing and understanding, we need to recognize. The speaker position here, is clearly (metaphoricall) held by the victims to be commemorated. But whom do they speak to? Literally, it is the „living“. In a very broad understanding, the monument/memorial therefore addresses all humans, quite in a way what Rüsen has addressed as the highest level of normative plausibility: broadening the perspective to the level of humanity.
This is not very problematic, since the inscription does talk of „duty“, not of „guilt“, it does not conflate the addressees with those who inflicted the injustice upon the victims. But it could have done. In 1945, the message would be clearly not merely universally humanistic, but at least also addressing the Germans as the society of the perpetrators. It does not condemn, but calls for recognizing the „duty“ and responsibility for commemorating and non-repeating as well as overcoming the structures of NS injustice, hinting at responsibility for not preventing them or even participating in them in the first place.

And today? In how far is the message the same for today’s society in Germany? The people living in Germany today do — apart from very few exceptions — no personal guilt or responsibility for what happened. In how far can or should they see themselvers addressed?

Again, there is no question as to the very general, humanity-related address. This encompasses any audience. But would that mean that there is no difference between any visitor to the memorial and Germans? Has the Nazi injustice (and similarly the Holocaust) become a matter of general, universal history only? Is there no special belonging to and message for German history? All these questions can and need be addressed — and especially so, since a considerable part of German society consists not only of people bornd and raised (long) after the „Third Reich“, but also of many who immigrated from other countries, societies and cultures meanwhile. Are they simply counted into the perpetrators‘ society? (no, I think), but are they (to feeld) addressed, too (yes!), and in the same way — to be reflected!

In order to make up our minds on monuments we have „inherited“ not only in political terms, we need to reflect their specific narrative message in a spectrum of time-relations. And we need to differentiate our terminology and enable our students to master a set of concepts related. We need, e.g., to distinguish honoring commemoration from reminding and admonishing. In Germany we have (not easliy) developed the notion of „Mahnmal“, admonishing, to be distinguished from a mere „Denkmal“. But even this distinction is insufficient. A Mahnmal (in fact the literal translation to „monument“, from Latin „admonere“) may admonish to remember our own suffering inflicted on us by ourselves, some tragic or by others, but also may admonish to not forget what we inflicted on others. This is the specific form „negative memory“ of German memorial culture.

Therefore, there’s a lot more to be reflected in commemorating:

  • Who „talks“? who authors the narrative — and is what capacity (e.g. in lieuf of „the people“, of a certain group, …)?
  • whom does the monument explicity address?
  • what is the relation of explicit addressees and factual spectators?
  • in how far is the message the same for us today as it was envisioned back then — and possibly realized? is it the same for all of us?
  • what kind of message is perceived?

(cf. Körber 2014)

 

References:

  • Hasberg, Wolfgang (2012): Analytische Wege zu besserem Geschichtsunterricht. Historisches Denken im Handlungszusammenhang Geschichtsunterricht. In: Meyer-Hamme, Johannes / Thünemann, Holger / Zülsdorf-Kersting, Meik (Hrsg.): Was heißt guter Geschichtsunterricht? Perspektiven im Vergleich. Schwalbach/Ts. / Wochenschau, S. 137–160, p. 140.
  • Klingel, Kerstin (2006): Eichenkranz und Dornenkrone. Kriegerdenkmäler in Hamburg. Hamburg: Landeszentrale für Politische Bildung.
  • Körber, Andreas (2014): De-Constructing Memory Culture. In: Teaching historical memories in an intercultural perspective. Concepts and methods : experiences and results from the TeacMem project. Hrsg. von Helle Bjerg, Andreas Körber, Claudia Lenz u. Oliver von Wrochem. Berlin 2014, 145-151.
  • Körber, Andreas (2016): Sinnbildungstypen als Graduierungen? Versuch einer Klärung am Beispiel der Historischen Fragekompetenz. In: Katja Lehmann, Michael Werner und Stefanie Zabold (Hg.): Historisches Denken jetzt und in Zukunft. Wege zu einem theoretisch fundierten und evidenzbasierten Umgang mit Geschichte. Festschrift für Waltraud Schreiber zum 60. Geburtstag. Berlin, Münster: Lit Verlag (Geschichtsdidaktik in Vergangenheit und Gegenwart, 10), S. 27–41.
  • Rüsen, Jörn (2017): Evidence and Meaning. A Theory of Historical Studies. Unter Mitarbeit von Diane Kerns und Katie Digan. New York, NY: Berghahn Books Incorporated (Making Sense of History Ser, v.28).
  1.   Lévesque, Stéphane: Removing the “Past”: Debates Over Official Sites of Memory. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 29, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12570. There also is a German and a French version. []
  2. Another such crosstabulation has been suggested (in German) by Wolfgang Hasberg (Analytische Wege zu besserem Geschichtsunterricht. Historisches Denken im Handlungszusammenhang Geschichtsunterricht. In: Meyer-Hamme, Johannes / Thünemann, Holger / Zülsdorf-Kersting, Meik (Hrsg.): Was heißt guter Geschichtsunterricht? Perspektiven im Vergleich. Schwalbach/Ts. / Wochenschau, S. 137–160, p. 140). For my critique see Körber 2016 (in German). I also provided a table, including the different niveaus, but restricted to „Fragekompetenz“ (similar to Stéphane’s „inquiry competence“). []
  3. I used this also in a twitter-discussion with Kim Wagner (@KimAtiWagner) recently. []
  4. For more pictures and information see also https://www.denk-mal-gegen-krieg.de/kriegerdenkmaeler/hamburg-lo-os/. []
  5. On this type of monuments cf. Koselleck, Reinhart (1994): Einleitung. In: Reinhart Koselleck und Michael Jeismann (Hg.): Der politische Totenkult. Kriegerdenkmäler in der Moderne. München: Fink (Bild und Text), S. 9–20, here p. 18f. []
  6. Kerstin Klingel tells a somewhat different story, according to which the mourning-relief was to be replaced by „war symbols“ but all skteches handed in by artists (including a wrath with swords by Ruwoldt) were rejected, so that he was commissioned to create an eagle, which he did, but in a way which far more resembled a dove than an eagle; cf. Klingel 2006, p. 71). In how far this might already have invoked connotations of peace rather that war, is questionable, though, given that the dove as the universial symbol for peace was created by Picasso only after WorldWar II []
  7. Cf. e.g. his „Invisible Monument“ in Sarbrücken: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platz_des_Unsichtbaren_Mahnmals. []
  8. Cf. a.o. Wijsenbeek, Dinah: Denkmal und Gegendenkmal. Über den kritischen Umgang mit der Vergangenheit auf dem Gebiet der bildenden Kunst. München 2010. []
  9.  There’s a lot more to be reflected in commemorating: Who talks to whom, here? What do they say and expect? Who is the „you“? Is it “ us“ – still today? And if so: in how far is the message the same for all of us, those with Hamburg ancestors of the time, and those without, maybe immigrants? In how far can this aspect define our attitude? Can we force all recent immigrants into our own „national“ narrative (and even more so when it is not WW1, but Holocaust related)? But then, how can we not? (cf. also Körber 2014, and see below. []
  10.  My mother used to explain the German word „Denkmal“, literally referrring to a „mark(er)“ for initiating thinking, as an imperative: „Denk mal!“, referring to the other meaning of the word „mal“ as „for once“, resulting in „do think for once!“ []
  11.  Cf. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/15/Neuengamme_memorial.jpg/800px-Neuengamme_memorial.jpg, (photo by Hao Liu in the public domain) []

A new competency-model on monuments using Rüsen’s four types by Stéphane Levesque — and a comment

Körber, Andreas (2018): „A new competency-model on monuments using Rüsen’s four types by Stéphane Levesque — and a comment.“ In: Historisch denken lernen (14.10.2018):

In a recent contribution to Public History Weekly, titled „Removing the ‚Past‘: Debates Over Official Sites of Memory“1Stéphane Lévesque from Ottawa, Canada, presented a new model for monument-related competencies of historical thinking, using Jörn Rüsen’s types of historical narrating.

The graphic version of the model consists of four „competences“, visualized as smaller cogwheels arranged around and interacting with a central cogwheel titled with „historical consciousness“. For each of the four competencies, a short, monument-related definition is given.

Prompted by a commentary by Gabriel Reich of Virginia Commonwealth University, who also works extensively on monuments in memory culture, Stéphane Lévesque added a (more general) table version (a Spanish translation by Elizabeth Montanares Vargas has been presented on facebook, meanwhile) in an answering comment, further detailing the competencies in his model.2.

As much as I appreciate this new model of competencies in general, I have also added a few comments to it (and to one point of Gabriel Reich’s comment, which is not in focus, here). The space provided by Public history weekly for commenting is limited and graphs are (at least not easily) allowed. I therefore use this my own blog for repeating my comment to Lévesque’s model, and to detail it a bit further.

First of all, I strongly support the initiative to analyse monuments as an expression of and factor for historical consciousness. Indeed, we need both a) to analyse them as experts by using our repertoire of historiographic methods and concepts in order to stimulate and support informed public discussion about whether a particular monument is still desirable (or at least acceptable) or whether it needs to be changed (and how) or even removed, and b) to develop people’s competences to address these issues themselves, i.e. to reflect on the nature, meaning and message of a monument both at the time of its construction and today (e.g. through preservation, maintenance, alteration, commenting or removal).

For this reason, I greatly appreciate Stéphane’s proposal for a competency model, especially the table version from the commentary above. This does not mean that I fully support the concrete model, but it has enriched the debate. Three comments on this:

(1) I doubt that competence as such can be “traditional”, “exemplary”, “genetic”, “critical” or “genetic”. These patterns, both as I understand Rüsen and for myself, characterize the logic of narratives. I would therefore rather read the table as “the competence to query in the traditional mode” … “the competence to narrate in critical mode” etc.

(2) This again raises the question of whether the four patterns actually constitute a distinction of competence niveaus. While I agree that the genetic mode of narrating history is the historically most recent, complex and suitable for explaining changes, I doubt – this time against Rüsen (cf. Körber 2016) – that the typology can describe competence levels.
The competence progression would need to be defined transversally: From (a) a basic level of non-distinctive (and thus unconsciously confusing) forms and patterns, via (b) the ability to perform all these forms of operations in the various patterns of Stéphane’s table (which would this describe a fully developed intermediate level), to (c) an elaborated level of (additional) ability to think about the nature of these disctions, etc.

For this, the model is very useful, full of ideas. It can help to think about what it takes to describe monuments neither as “the past” nor as “simply old”, but to identify and “read” them as narratives (or narrative abbreviations) from a certain time, whose current treatment adds new narrative layers to them, so that their existence (or absence), form, and treatment of them can always be seen and evaluated as contemporary statements about the respective past. To recognize this and to deal with it in a socially responsible way requires these competences.

As far as Gabriel Reich’s commentary is concerned, I only ask whether his characterization of an attitude to the confederation monuments can really be addressed with Rüsen as “exemplary”, since this mode is not concerned with the maintenance and support of a conventional identity, but with the derivation of a supertemporal rule. I would refer to the example as “traditional”. An “exemplary” attitude towards retention would be more likely to be: “At all times, monuments of one’s own heroes have helped the losers of war to hold on to their cause. Then that must be possible for us too.” Or something along that line.

So far the comment already published in Public History Weekly.

That said, I might add, that I don’t mean that the „genetic“ way of sensemaking is not in some way superior to the others, and more apt for historical meaning-making, especially in its integration of a notion of directed change over time. My scepticism focuses on the idea that today’s people’s („ontogenetic“) competencies of historical thinking progresses along the same line as the cultural („phylogenetic“) developoment of Rüsen’s patterns of sensemaking throughout the history of historiography. Today’s youth simultaneously encounter manifestations of historical thinking using all three (rather than four)3 patterns of sensemaking. While there is a kind of „development“ of power of historical meaning-making and explanation from traditional via exemplaric to genetic, I doubt that people and students have to move from the former to the latter — or do so.

My own idea of development of competencies of historical thinking can rather be visualized as follows (adopting Lévesque’s table):

Three niveaus/levels of competencies (schematic), following the FUER-model (cf. Körber 2015). The graph uses the table-version of Stéphane Lévesque's competence-model for historical thinking on monuments (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-29/removing-past-official-memory/; courtesy of Stéphane Lévesque by e-mail Oct 15th, 2018). A.K. 2018
Three niveaus/levels of competencies (schematic), following the FUER-model (cf. Körber et al. 2007; Körber 2015)4. The graph uses the table-version of Stéphane Lévesque’s competence-model for historical thinking on monuments (https://public-history-weekly.degruyter.com/6-2018-29/removing-past-official-memory/; courtesy of Stéphane Lévesque by e-mail Oct 15th, 2018). A.K. 2018

 

  1. A „basic“ niveau (and possibly early stage) would be defined by the inability of distinguishing different modes of historical narrating in general and referring to monuments in this specific case. (Young) people on this niveau (at this stage) will relate to them. They will ask questions (and thus exercise their „inquiry competence“), think („historical thinking competence“), orientate themselves („orientation competence“), and narrate („narrative competence“). But this basic niveau will not be defined by being „traditional“, but by an uninformed mixing (possibly only half-understood) forms of all three patterns. This performance will be both instable and inconsistent. Half-baked traditional questions will stand next to unreflected exemplary statements, and so on. In the graph above, this is symbolized by the blurred table below.
  2. The ability to apply the different patterns in a somewhat clarified way, to distinguish them and select one, to identify inconsistencies in their mixing, etc., then marks the intermediary niveau, and possible a major stage in the development of these competencies. On this niveau, at this stage, people will be able to discuss about the message a monument expresses and the meaning it has for us today, but they might disagree and even quarrel because they apply different patterns of meaning-making.
    In a way, Lévesque’s table describes this intermediate niveau, the different forms of historical inquiring, thinking, orientating, and narrating can take, depending from the general pattern of sensemaking. The table (the middle one in the graph above) clearly points at something, I have also tried to express in my German article challenging Rüsen’s own idea of the different patterns forming different nivueaus of competencies5: Each of the different operations (inquiring, narrating, orientating) will take on a specific stance of narrating. It is a difference whether I ask for a tradition or for a rule to be derived from past examples, or about a patterns of change across time. These questions are informed by more general stances and understandings of history (maybe coded in Lévesque’s central cogwheel of „historical consciousness“) and will generate different forms of orientation and narrating. This does not mean that the initial stance determines the outcome of the story, rendering historical thinking a matter of self-affirmation – not at all. A person inquiring in traditional will look for an origin for something valid and might — via historical thinking and research — learn of a quite different origin. The mode of meaning-making will still be traditional, but the concrete history will have changed. But people might also be forced to change their pattern in the process, e.g. learning of the limits of exemplary thinking when gaining insight into fundamental change, and thus „progress“ in a way from exemplary to genetic sensemaking.
  3. The highest niveau, however, will be reached not by finally arriving at the genetic forms of thinking and the respective competencies, but by complementing the ability to recognize, distinguish and apply the different forma with a transgressing ability to reflect on the nature, value and limits of this (and other) typologies themselves. Only on this niveau (at this stage) are people fully at command of their historical reflection. They can address the limits societally accepted concepts and terminology pose and suggest new or amended ones, etc. In the graph above, this is symbolized by the additional focus to the rubrics of Lévesque’s table, marked by the blue rings.
  1.   Lévesque, Stéphane: Removing the “Past”: Debates Over Official Sites of Memory. In: Public History Weekly 6 (2018) 29, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018-12570. There also is a German and a French version. []
  2. The table can be found under the same address as the original contribution, down the page []
  3. Rüsen’s „critical“ type of narrating does not really fit into the typology, presenting not a new logic of interconnecting temporal information, but merely de-elgitimizing others. In 1988 already, Bodo von Borries commented on this and presented a graphical concept of the interrelation of the different types, in which a „critical“ type was placed between both the traditional and the exemplary and the latter and the genetic, thus assigning it the function of a catalyst of development (Borries, Bodo von (1988): Geschichtslernen und Geschichtsbewusstsein. Empirische Erkundungen zu Erwerb und Gebrauch von Historie. 1. Aufl. Stuttgart: Klett, p. 61; cf.  Körber, Andreas (2015): Historical consciousness, historical competencies – and beyond? Some conceptual development within German history didactics. Online verfügbar unter http://www.pedocs.de/volltexte/2015/10811/pdf/Koerber_2015_Development_German_History_Didactics.pdf, p. 14f.). In the new version of his „Historik“, Rüsen presents a similar version. Cf. Rüsen, Jörn (2013): Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft. Köln: Böhlau, p. 260. English: Rüsen, Jörn (2017): Evidence and Meaning. A Theory of Historical Studies. Unter Mitarbeit von Diane Kerns und Katie Digan. New York, NY: Berghahn Books Incorporated (Making Sense of History Ser, v.28), p. 198. []
  4.  Schreiber, Waltraud; Körber, Andreas; Borries, Bodo von; Krammer, Reinhard; Leutner-Ramme, Sibylla; Mebus, Sylvia et al. (2007): Historisches Denken. Ein Kompetenz-Strukturmodell (Basisbeitrag). In: Andreas Körber, Waltraud Schreiber und Alexander Schöner (Hg.): Kompetenzen historischen Denkens. Ein Strukturmodell als Beitrag zur Kompetenzorientierung in der Geschichtsdidaktik. Neuried: Ars Una Verlags-Gesellschaft (Kompetenzen, 2), S. 17–53; Körber, Andreas (2012): Graduierung historischer Kompetenzen. In: Michele Barricelli und Martin Lücke (Hg.): Handbuch Praxis des Geschichtsunterrichts. Historisches Lernen in der Schule, Bd. 1. Schwalbach/Ts.: Wochenschau Verlag (Wochenschau Geschichte), S. 236–254.; Körber, Andreas (2015): Historical consciousness, historical competencies – and beyond? Some conceptual development within German history didactics. Online verfügbar unter http://www.pedocs.de/volltexte/2015/10811/pdf/Koerber_2015_Development_German_History_Didactics.pdf, pp. 39ff []
  5.  Körber, Andreas (2016): Sinnbildungstypen als Graduierungen? Versuch einer Klärung am Beispiel der Historischen Fragekompetenz. In: Katja Lehmann, Michael Werner und Stefanie Zabold (Hg.): Historisches Denken jetzt und in Zukunft. Wege zu einem theoretisch fundierten und evidenzbasierten Umgang mit Geschichte. Festschrift für Waltraud Schreiber zum 60. Geburtstag. Berlin, Münster: Lit Verlag (Geschichtsdidaktik in Vergangenheit und Gegenwart, 10), S. 27–41. []

Neuer Beitrag zu Historischem Denken und Historischen Computerspielen

Körber, Andreas (2018): „Geschichte – Spielen – Denken. Kontingenzverschiebungen und zweiseitige Triftigkeiten“. In: MedienPädagogik. Zeitschrift für Theorie und Praxis der Medienbildung. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21240/mpaed/00/2018.04.04.X. Online verfügbar unter http://www.medienpaed.com/article/view/602.

Ein neuer Beitrag zu historischen Denken und Historischen Computerspielen ist nun erschienen:

Körber, Andreas (2018): „Geschichte – Spielen – Denken. Kontingenzverschiebungen und zweiseitige Triftigkeiten“. In: MedienPädagogik. Zeitschrift für Theorie und Praxis der Medienbildung. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21240/mpaed/00/2018.04.04.X. Online verfügbar unter http://www.medienpaed.com/article/view/602.

Interessante Diskussion über Historische (Computer)-Spiele und Authentizität

Eine interessante Diskussion Relevanz der Kategorie „Authentizität“ in Bezug auf Historische (Computer)-Spielen findet sich derzeit im Blog zum „Geschichtstalk im Super7000„:

„Die Authentizität, die nicht bleiben will.“

Vortrag zu "Living History" und Historischem Lernen in Warschau

Körber, Andreas: „Living History – Place, Purpose or Topic of Historical Learning?“. Talk at the Conference „Stepping Back in Time Living History and Other Performative Approaches to History in Central and South-Eastern Europe.“ Februaary 23–24, 2017, German Historical Institute Warsaw .

Am 23. und 24.2. 2017 fand im Deutschen Historischen  Institut in Warschau eine internationale Tagung statt zum Thema  „Stepping Back in Time Living History and Other Performative Approaches to History in Central and South-Eastern Europe.“ Ich habe dort einen Vortrag zu Fragen des Historischen Lernens in diesem Zusammenhang gehalten. Nachtrag 23.5.2017: Ein Tagungsbericht findet hier sich auf H-SOZ-KULT.