Analyzing Monuments using crosstabulations of Historical Thinking Competencies and Types of Narrating

Kör­ber, Andreas (2018): “Ana­lyz­ing Mon­u­ments using crosstab­u­la­tions of His­tor­i­cal Think­ing Com­pe­ten­cies and Types of Nar­rat­ing.” In: His­torisch Denken Ler­nen. Arbeits­bere­ich Geschichts­di­dak­tik der Uni­ver­sität Ham­burg. 16.10.2018.

The fol­low­ing is a fol­low-up in the dis­cus­sion on Stéphane Lévesques mod­el of his­tor­i­cal com­pe­ten­cies as pre­sent­ed in Pub­lic His­to­ry Week­ly, a few days ago, titled “Remov­ing the ‘Past’: Debates Over Offi­cial Sites of Mem­o­ry“1 and my first extend­ed com­ment on this pub­lished here on this blog.

A crosstab­u­la­tion of com­pe­ten­cies and patterns/logic of sense­mak­ing like Stéphane Lévesque sug­gest­ed2 is indeed use­ful for “read­ing” indi­vid­ual mon­u­ments and mak­ing sense of their “mes­sage”, also. Stéphane’s fill­ing of the table is a bit abstra­cht, gen­er­al for this, so the fol­low­ing would in part be my own under­stand­ing.

It also is based on Rüsen’s notion that while the dif­fer­ent pat­terns were devel­oped sequen­tial­ly over time, to “old­er” ones are not lost, but still avail­able and indeed vis­i­ble in mod­ern day think­ing, in fact most of the time in com­bi­na­tions. What char­ac­ter­izes mod­ern-time his­tor­i­cal think­ing, then, is the pres­ence and dom­i­nance of “genet­ic” think­ing, while pre-mod­ern thought would not have this type at its dis­pos­al at all. But then, our exam­ples here are all “mod­ern”, so that it may be a ques­tion of dom­i­nance and rel­a­tive weight.

Take a mon­u­ment for a civ­il war gen­er­al:

  • A spec­ta­tor today may read it as a reminder to the ori­gin of the cur­rent state of affairs, pos­si­bly the “los­ing of the cause” (e.g. both the hon­oured gen­er­al and the spec­ta­tor being southen­ers) or to the lib­er­a­tion of the slaves (both northen­ers). In both cas­es, the mon­u­ment would be seen as point­ing to an ori­gin of what is seen as valid today (the very def­i­n­i­tion of Rüsen’s “tra­di­tion­al” type). This might explain why peo­ple adher­ing to the north­ern nar­ra­tive would oppose to south­ern mon­u­ments, and vice ver­sa, not believe­ing their sto­ry in the first place — and maybe fear­ing that keep­ing the mon­u­ments would sig­ni­fy that their ver­sion was to be seen as valid.
  • In an exem­plar­ic mode, how­ev­er, both may accept the “oth­er side’s” mon­u­ments, because what they point at would not be seen as the ori­gin of affairs, but rather a gen­er­al rule, e.g. hon­our­ing peo­ple “brave­ly fight­ing for their respec­tive (!) cause”. The log­ic would be that each soci­ety would hon­or “their heroes”, who do not so much stand for the spe­cif­ic cause but for a gen­er­al rule. What hap­pens on the ground in Get­tys­burg, e.g., is some­thing along this line: “Tra­di­tion­al” com­mem­o­rat­ing attracts most peo­ple going there, but an exem­plary “cov­er-nar­ra­tive” allows for com­mon remem­brance.

Con­sid­er an exam­ple from Ham­burg, where I work 3: On our “Rathaus­markt”, there is a mon­u­ment, hon­our­ing Hamburg’s dead from WW1. When it was erect­ed in 1932, it looked as it does today. The inscrip­tion on one side reads “four­ty thou­sand sons of town left their lives for you” (in Ger­man: “Vierzig Tausend Söhne der Stadt ließen ihr Leben für Euch”) and a relief of a woman (moth­er) and child (daugh­ter) appar­ent­ly com­fort­ing each oth­er in mourn­ing (and there­fore rem­i­nis­cent of a pietà) by Ernst Bar­lach on the oth­er side.

Ernst Barlach: Relief (1931; Re-construction) auf dem Mahnmal auf dem Hamburger Rathausmarkt. Foto von Wikimedia Commons (gemeinfrei): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/Hamburg_Mahnmal_01_KMJ-adj.jpg
Ernst Bar­lach: Relief (Pietà; 1931; Re-con­struc­tion) auf dem Mah­n­mal auf dem Ham­burg­er Rathaus­markt. Foto von Wiki­me­dia Com­mons (geme­in­frei): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/Hamburg_Mahnmal_01_KMJ-adj.jpg

In 1938, the relief was exchanged for an eagle fly­ing up.4 

Hans-Mar­tin Ruwoldt (1938): Adler auf dem Ham­burg­er Ehren­mal am Rathaus­markt. Foto von https://www.denk-mal-gegen-krieg.de/kriegerdenkmaeler/hamburg-lo-os/

Did the form of com­mem­o­ra­tion, the valu­ing of the 40000 Ham­bur­gians, change? I do think so.

Already the addi­tion of “for you” as a con­ces­sion to the right par­ties changes a more tra­di­tion­al mes­sage into a more exem­plary one, which is made promi­nent by the exchange of the relief: It is even more pos­si­ble, because what are two dif­fer­ent con­cepts and terms in Eng­lish lan­guage, share a com­mon word in Ger­man: “Opfer”:

Despite the active voice of the inscrip­tion and in spite of the (added) “for you”, the moth­er and daugth­er-relief marks the dead sol­diers rather as vic­tims of a greater con­text of war, to be mourned, their rather “trag­ic” deaths and loss as the ori­gin or our com­mon grief, and there­fore seems to incor­po­rate ele­ments of a new kind of mon­u­ments, devel­oped in WW1, which do no longer pro­vide, but rather ques­tion the mean­ing of the deaths.5 The eagle (or “phoenix” as the sculp­tor Hans Mar­tin Ruwoldt was com­mis­sioned), how­ev­er, erad­i­cat­ed this (thin on not exclu­sive) lay­er of ques­tion­s­ing, and ren­ders the 40.000 exem­plar­ic “sac­ri­fices” — heroes to be emu­lat­ed, cel­e­brat­ed.6.
In 1948, the lost Bar­lach-relief, was restored, alas not by Bar­lach him­self, who had died mean­while.

I do have a hard time con­struct­ing a genet­ic under­stand­ing of such a mon­u­ment, maybe because a mod­ern, genet­ic way of think­ing needs to have been informed by the “crit­i­cal” mode of at least part­ly de-legit­imiz­ing the ori­en­tat­ing pow­er of tra­di­tion­al and exem­plar­ic think­ing.

Maybe this is the back­ground for mod­ern mon­u­ments being quite dif­fer­ent, either often non-fig­u­ra­tive — as Peter Eisenman’s Memo­r­i­al to the Mur­dered Jews in Berlin, or many works by Jochen Gerz7 — or tak­ing on forms of counter-memo­ri­al­iza­tion8, thus set­ting in motion a kind of change, not just re-present-ing a past, but encour­ag­ing or even enforc­ing crit­i­cal reflec­tion on it.

It is eas­i­er for the Ham­burg mon­u­ment: Genet­ic think­ing would ques­tion whether not only this hero­ify­ing way of com­mem­o­rat­ing heroes (even if not indi­vid­ual), but also the con­crete form of pub­lic acknowl­edg­ing of trag­ic loss can be time­ly, after we expe­ri­enced anoth­er war and an inhu­man dic­ta­tor­ship and geno­cide which was not least based on feel­ings insti­gat­ed by such com­mem­o­rat­ing.9

But there is some­thing more to reflect­ing about nar­ra­tives — and espe­cial­ly on how to relate to them. As I wrote above, Memo­ri­als are nar­ra­tives. Rüsen calls them “nar­ra­tive abbre­vi­a­tions”, point­ing to them stand­ing for a spe­cif­ic nar­ra­tive, i.e. a spe­cif­ic rela­tion between a past (under mem­o­ry), the present (of the authors and erec­tors of the mon­u­ment as well as the intend­ed pub­lic), and with regard to a spe­cif­ic future, con­struct­ed only part­ly in ver­bal nar­ra­tive form, but also with non-ver­bal and sequen­tial­ly nar­ra­tive ele­ments (even though in some cas­es it is only the ver­bal inscrip­tions which real­ly hint to any his­tor­i­cal mean­ing).

Memo­ri­als are more than only pro­to-nar­ra­tives. Their (often) promi­nent (albeit also often over­looked) posi­tion­ing, their (proto-)narrative struc­ture and their own qual­i­ty for last­ing a long time (cf. “mon­u­men­tum exe­gi aere peren­nius), they do not only con­sti­tute a nar­ra­tive rela­tion from one tem­po­ral and social posi­tion towrds the past and the future, but also are meant to pro­long the sense they make and to impose it on lat­er gen­er­a­tions. Mon­u­ments are about oblig­at­ing their audi­ence, the spec­ta­tors with a cer­tain nar­ra­tive and inter­pre­ta­tion. That qual­i­fies them as parts of what we call “pol­i­tics of his­to­ry”, not only of com­mem­o­ra­tion, and what makes them polit­i­cal.

It there­fore is para­mount to read mon­u­ments as nar­ra­tives, and not only in the de-con­struc­tive sense of “what did those erec­tors make of that past back then”, but also in the re-conc­truc­tive sense of “in how far or how does this nar­ra­tive fit into my/our rela­tion to that past). In oth­er words: Stand­ing before a mon­u­ment and think­ing about mon­u­ments, we all need to (and in fact do) think in a com­bi­na­tion of under­stand­ing the oth­ers’ and delib­er­at­ing our own nar­ra­tive mean­ing-mak­ing.
There­fore we need to read them as nar­ra­tives first, and become com­pe­tent for it.

Mon­u­ments often take on the form of address­ing peo­ple. Some­times — as in the Ham­burg case above — they address the spec­ta­tor, remind­ing them of some kind of oblig­a­tion to com­mem­o­rate.10 But who is talk­ing to whom? If the sen­ate of Ham­burg talkes to that to the Ham­burg cit­i­zens of 1930–1932, can/will we accept that (a) the Ham­burg Sen­ate of today still admon­ish­es us like that, and b) that we Ham­burg cit­i­zens of today are still addressed in the same way?

In oth­er cas­es, (inscrip­tions in) memo­ri­als might explic­it­ly address the com­mem­o­rat­ed them­selves, as e.g. in the con­fed­er­ate mon­u­ment in Yanceyville, N.C., whose plaque reads “To the Sons of Caswell Coun­ty who served in the War of 1861–1865 in answer to the Call of their Coun­ty”, and con­tin­ues in a “We-Voice”, signed by the Caswell Chap­ter of the Unit­ed Daugh­ters of the Con­fed­er­a­cy”. So far so con­ven­tion­al. This might be rather unprob­lem­at­ic, since speak­er-posi­tion and addressees are clear­ly marked. One might leave the mon­u­ment even if one dis­agreed, not hav­ing to align with its nar­ra­tive. Only if the pres­ence of such com­mem­o­rat­ing in itself is inac­cept­able, action is imme­di­ate­ly called for.

But there are oth­er mon­u­ments which seem to talk from a neu­tral posi­tion, which in fact is that of the erec­tors, but by not being qual­i­fied, includes the spec­ta­tor into the speak­er posi­tion. The exam­ple I have ready at hand, is not from the US and not about war heroes, but again from Ham­burg, this time from Neuengamme con­cen­tra­tion camp memo­r­i­al. In 1965, an “inter­na­tion­al mon­u­ment” stele11 was erect­ed there, togeth­er with a whole series of coun­try-spe­cif­ic memo­r­i­al plates. The inscrip­tion on the mon­u­ment reads “Your suf­fer­ing, your fight­ing and your death shall not be in vain” (my trans­la­tion).
This now clear­ly is inter­est­ing in at least two respects: (1) it ascribes not only suf­fer­ing and death, but also fight­ing to those com­mem­o­rat­ed and there­by pos­si­bly does not refer to those inmates who nev­er had a chance or did not “fight”, who were pure vic­tims, and (2) it speaks from a neu­tral voice which is not marked in time and social, polit­i­cal or event-relat­ed posi­tion. Who­ev­er mourns at that place pos­si­bly silent­ly co-signs the state­ment.

International Monument (1965) at Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial (partial photo; (c) 2006 Andreas Körber)
Inter­na­tion­al Mon­u­ment (1965) at Neuengamme Con­cen­tra­tion Camp Memo­r­i­al (par­tial pho­to; © 2006 Andreas Kör­ber)

Con­sid­er an equal hon­our­ing of con­fed­er­ate gen­er­als in, say NC: “Your fight­ing shall not have been in vain.” I would spark much more con­tro­ver­sy and con­cers — and right­ly so.

Still anoth­er exam­ple, the first Ham­burg mon­u­ment for the vic­tims of Nation­al Social­ism (from late 1945) on the Cen­tral Ceme­try in Ham­burg-Ohls­dorf, has an inscrip­tion “Injus­tice brought Us Death — Liv­ing: Rec­og­nize your Oblig­a­tion”.

Erstes Hamburger Mahnmal für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus von 11/1945 in Hamburg Ohlsdorf. Foto von NordNordWest/Wikipedia. Lizenz: CC-BY-SA 3.0; (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/de/legalcode); Original: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mahnmal_Opfer_der_NS-Verfolgung_Ohlsdorf.jpg
Erstes Ham­burg­er Mah­n­mal für die Opfer des Nation­al­sozial­is­mus von 11/1945 in Ham­burg Ohls­dorf. Foto von NordNordWest/Wikipedia. Lizenz: CC-BY-SA 3.0; (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/de/legalcode); Orig­i­nal: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mahnmal_Opfer_der_NS-Verfolgung_Ohlsdorf.jpg

 

Erstes Hamburger Mahnmal für die Opfer des Nationalsozialismus von 11/1945 in Hamburg Ohlsdorf; Detail. Zustand 25.3.2010; Foto (c) Andreas Körber
Erstes Ham­burg­er Mah­n­mal für die Opfer des Nation­al­sozial­is­mus von 11/1945 in Ham­burg Ohls­dorf; Detail. Zus­tand 25.3.2010; Foto © Andreas Kör­ber

 

Again, for ana­lyz­ing and under­stand­ing, we need to rec­og­nize. The speak­er posi­tion here, is clear­ly (metaphor­i­call) held by the vic­tims to be com­mem­o­rat­ed. But whom do they speak to? Lit­er­al­ly, it is the “liv­ing”. In a very broad under­stand­ing, the monument/memorial there­fore address­es all humans, quite in a way what Rüsen has addressed as the high­est lev­el of nor­ma­tive plau­si­bil­i­ty: broad­en­ing the per­spec­tive to the lev­el of human­i­ty.
This is not very prob­lem­at­ic, since the inscrip­tion does talk of “duty”, not of “guilt”, it does not con­flate the addressees with those who inflict­ed the injus­tice upon the vic­tims. But it could have done. In 1945, the mes­sage would be clear­ly not mere­ly uni­ver­sal­ly human­is­tic, but at least also address­ing the Ger­mans as the soci­ety of the per­pe­tra­tors. It does not con­demn, but calls for rec­og­niz­ing the “duty” and respon­si­bil­i­ty for com­mem­o­rat­ing and non-repeat­ing as well as over­com­ing the struc­tures of NS injus­tice, hint­ing at respon­si­bil­i­ty for not pre­vent­ing them or even par­tic­i­pat­ing in them in the first place.

And today? In how far is the mes­sage the same for today’s soci­ety in Ger­many? The peo­ple liv­ing in Ger­many today do — apart from very few excep­tions — no per­son­al guilt or respon­si­bil­i­ty for what hap­pened. In how far can or should they see them­selvers addressed?

Again, there is no ques­tion as to the very gen­er­al, human­i­ty-relat­ed address. This encom­pass­es any audi­ence. But would that mean that there is no dif­fer­ence between any vis­i­tor to the memo­r­i­al and Ger­mans? Has the Nazi injus­tice (and sim­i­lar­ly the Holo­caust) become a mat­ter of gen­er­al, uni­ver­sal his­to­ry only? Is there no spe­cial belong­ing to and mes­sage for Ger­man his­to­ry? All these ques­tions can and need be addressed — and espe­cial­ly so, since a con­sid­er­able part of Ger­man soci­ety con­sists not only of peo­ple bornd and raised (long) after the “Third Reich”, but also of many who immi­grat­ed from oth­er coun­tries, soci­eties and cul­tures mean­while. Are they sim­ply count­ed into the per­pe­tra­tors’ soci­ety? (no, I think), but are they (to feeld) addressed, too (yes!), and in the same way — to be reflect­ed!

In order to make up our minds on mon­u­ments we have “inher­it­ed” not only in polit­i­cal terms, we need to reflect their spe­cif­ic nar­ra­tive mes­sage in a spec­trum of time-rela­tions. And we need to dif­fer­en­ti­ate our ter­mi­nol­o­gy and enable our stu­dents to mas­ter a set of con­cepts relat­ed. We need, e.g., to dis­tin­guish hon­or­ing com­mem­o­ra­tion from remind­ing and admon­ish­ing. In Ger­many we have (not easliy) devel­oped the notion of “Mah­n­mal”, admon­ish­ing, to be dis­tin­guished from a mere “Denkmal”. But even this dis­tinc­tion is insuf­fi­cient. A Mah­n­mal (in fact the lit­er­al trans­la­tion to “mon­u­ment”, from Latin “admonere”) may admon­ish to remem­ber our own suf­fer­ing inflict­ed on us by our­selves, some trag­ic or by oth­ers, but also may admon­ish to not for­get what we inflict­ed on oth­ers. This is the spe­cif­ic form “neg­a­tive mem­o­ry” of Ger­man memo­r­i­al cul­ture.

There­fore, there’s a lot more to be reflect­ed in com­mem­o­rat­ing:

  • Who “talks”? who authors the nar­ra­tive — and is what capac­i­ty (e.g. in lieuf of “the peo­ple”, of a cer­tain group, …)?
  • whom does the mon­u­ment explic­i­ty address?
  • what is the rela­tion of explic­it addressees and fac­tu­al spec­ta­tors?
  • in how far is the mes­sage the same for us today as it was envi­sioned back then — and pos­si­bly real­ized? is it the same for all of us?
  • what kind of mes­sage is per­ceived?

(cf. Kör­ber 2014)

 

Ref­er­ences:

  • Has­berg, Wolf­gang (2012): Ana­lytis­che Wege zu besserem Geschicht­sun­ter­richt. His­torisches Denken im Hand­lungszusam­men­hang Geschicht­sun­ter­richt. In: Mey­er-Hamme, Johannes / Thüne­mann, Hol­ger / Züls­dorf-Ker­st­ing, Meik (Hrsg.): Was heißt guter Geschicht­sun­ter­richt? Per­spek­tiv­en im Ver­gle­ich. Schwalbach/Ts. / Wochen­schau, S. 137–160, p. 140.
  • Klin­gel, Ker­stin (2006): Eichenkranz und Dor­nenkro­ne. Kriegerdenkmäler in Ham­burg. Ham­burg: Lan­deszen­trale für Poli­tis­che Bil­dung.
  • Kör­ber, Andreas (2014): De-Con­struct­ing Mem­o­ry Cul­ture. In: Teach­ing his­tor­i­cal mem­o­ries in an inter­cul­tur­al per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and meth­ods : expe­ri­ences and results from the TeacMem project. Hrsg. von Helle Bjerg, Andreas Kör­ber, Clau­dia Lenz u. Oliv­er von Wrochem. Berlin 2014, 145–151.
  • Kör­ber, Andreas (2016): Sinnbil­dungstypen als Graduierun­gen? Ver­such ein­er Klärung am Beispiel der His­torischen Fragekom­pe­tenz. In: Kat­ja Lehmann, Michael Wern­er und Ste­fanie Zabold (Hg.): His­torisches Denken jet­zt und in Zukun­ft. Wege zu einem the­o­retisch fundierten und evi­denzbasierten Umgang mit Geschichte. Festschrift für Wal­traud Schreiber zum 60. Geburt­stag. Berlin, Mün­ster: Lit Ver­lag (Geschichts­di­dak­tik in Ver­gan­gen­heit und Gegen­wart, 10), S. 27–41.
  • Rüsen, Jörn (2017): Evi­dence and Mean­ing. A The­o­ry of His­tor­i­cal Stud­ies. Unter Mitar­beit von Diane Kerns und Katie Digan. New York, NY: Berghahn Books Incor­po­rat­ed (Mak­ing Sense of His­to­ry Ser, v.28).
  1.   Lévesque, Stéphane: Remov­ing the “Past”: Debates Over Offi­cial Sites of Mem­o­ry. In: Pub­lic His­to­ry Week­ly 6 (2018) 29, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2018–12570. There also is a Ger­man and a French ver­sion. []
  2. Anoth­er such crosstab­u­la­tion has been sug­gest­ed (in Ger­man) by Wolf­gang Has­berg (Ana­lytis­che Wege zu besserem Geschicht­sun­ter­richt. His­torisches Denken im Hand­lungszusam­men­hang Geschicht­sun­ter­richt. In: Mey­er-Hamme, Johannes / Thüne­mann, Hol­ger / Züls­dorf-Ker­st­ing, Meik (Hrsg.): Was heißt guter Geschicht­sun­ter­richt? Per­spek­tiv­en im Ver­gle­ich. Schwalbach/Ts. / Wochen­schau, S. 137–160, p. 140). For my cri­tique see Kör­ber 2016 (in Ger­man). I also pro­vid­ed a table, includ­ing the dif­fer­ent niveaus, but restrict­ed to “Fragekom­pe­tenz” (sim­i­lar to Stéphane’s “inquiry com­pe­tence”). []
  3. I used this also in a twit­ter-dis­cus­sion with Kim Wag­n­er (@KimAtiWagner) recent­ly. []
  4. For more pic­tures and infor­ma­tion see also https://www.denk-mal-gegen-krieg.de/kriegerdenkmaeler/hamburg-lo-os/. []
  5. On this type of mon­u­ments cf. Kosel­leck, Rein­hart (1994): Ein­leitung. In: Rein­hart Kosel­leck und Michael Jeis­mann (Hg.): Der poli­tis­che Totenkult. Kriegerdenkmäler in der Mod­erne. München: Fink (Bild und Text), S. 9–20, here p. 18f. []
  6. Ker­stin Klin­gel tells a some­what dif­fer­ent sto­ry, accord­ing to which the mourn­ing-relief was to be replaced by “war sym­bols” but all sktech­es hand­ed in by artists (includ­ing a wrath with swords by Ruwoldt) were reject­ed, so that he was com­mis­sioned to cre­ate an eagle, which he did, but in a way which far more resem­bled a dove than an eagle; cf. Klin­gel 2006, p. 71). In how far this might already have invoked con­no­ta­tions of peace rather that war, is ques­tion­able, though, giv­en that the dove as the uni­ver­sial sym­bol for peace was cre­at­ed by Picas­so only after World­War II []
  7. Cf. e.g. his “Invis­i­ble Mon­u­ment” in Sar­brück­en: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platz_des_Unsichtbaren_Mahnmals. []
  8. Cf. a.o. Wijsen­beek, Dinah: Denkmal und Gegen­denkmal. Über den kri­tis­chen Umgang mit der Ver­gan­gen­heit auf dem Gebi­et der bilden­den Kun­st. München 2010. []
  9.  There’s a lot more to be reflect­ed in com­mem­o­rat­ing: Who talks to whom, here? What do they say and expect? Who is the “you”? Is it ” us” — still today? And if so: in how far is the mes­sage the same for all of us, those with Ham­burg ances­tors of the time, and those with­out, maybe immi­grants? In how far can this aspect define our atti­tude? Can we force all recent immi­grants into our own “nation­al” nar­ra­tive (and even more so when it is not WW1, but Holo­caust relat­ed)? But then, how can we not? (cf. also Kör­ber 2014, and see below. []
  10.  My moth­er used to explain the Ger­man word “Denkmal”, lit­er­al­ly refer­rring to a “mark(er)” for ini­ti­at­ing think­ing, as an imper­a­tive: “Denk mal!”, refer­ring to the oth­er mean­ing of the word “mal” as “for once”, result­ing in “do think for once!” []
  11.  Cf. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/15/Neuengamme_memorial.jpg/800px-Neuengamme_memorial.jpg, (pho­to by Hao Liu in the pub­lic domain) []

ANMELDUNG VERLÄNGERT BIS 28.2.2017: Zusätzliches Lehrangebot im SoSe 2017: Seminar mit Exkursion nach USA/Polen

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nach der ersten Anmelderunde sind noch Plätze frei — ins­beson­dere für den Teil zu Grundwald/Tannenberg mit der Exkur­sion nach Polen!
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Das Sem­i­nar ist für Lehramtsstudierende ein Fach­di­dak­tik M.Ed.-Seminar “Weit­er­führung der Fach­di­dak­tik Geschichte” (Mod­ul 001k). Es ist für Studierende im B.A./B.Sc.-Lehramt Geschichte mit abgeschlossen­er Mod­ul­prü­fung zugänglich und kann später im M.Ed.-Studium angerech­net wer­den

Vortrag zu interkulturellem Lernen an Gedenkstätten

Kör­ber, Andreas (27. 5. 2014): “TeacMem – Devel­op­ing Com­pe­tence-Ori­ent­ed Teach­ing on His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries.” Vor­trag auf der Fach­ta­gung »Gemein­sam erin­nern, gemein­sam Zukun­ft gestal­ten« des Päd­a­gogis­chen Aus­tausch­di­en­stes (PAD) der Kul­tus­min­is­terkon­ferenz am 26./27. Mai 2014 in Bonn.

Kör­ber, Andreas (27. 5. 2014): “TeacMem – Devel­op­ing Com­pe­tence-Ori­ent­ed Teach­ing on His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries.” Vor­trag auf der Fach­ta­gung »Gemein­sam erin­nern, gemein­sam Zukun­ft gestal­ten« des Päd­a­gogis­chen Aus­tausch­di­en­stes (PAD) der Kul­tus­min­is­terkon­ferenz am 26./27. Mai 2014 in Bonn.

gerade erschienen: Körber, Andreas “De-Constructing Memory Culture.”

Kör­ber, Andreas “De-Con­struct­ing Mem­o­ry Cul­ture.” In: Bjerg, Helle; Kör­ber, Andreas; Lenz, Clau­dia; von Wrochem, Oliv­er (2014; Eds.): Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and Meth­ods. Expe­ri­ences and Results from the TeacMem Project. Berlin: Metropol (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en; 4); ISBN: 9783863311148, S. 145–150.

Ein Kri­te­rienkat­a­log zur Analyse von Aus­drucks­for­men his­torisch­er Erin­nerun­gen.

Kör­ber, Andreas “De-Con­struct­ing Mem­o­ry Cul­ture.” In: Bjerg, Helle; Kör­ber, Andreas; Lenz, Clau­dia; von Wrochem, Oliv­er (2014; Eds.): Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and Meth­ods. Expe­ri­ences and Results from the TeacMem Project. Berlin: Metropol (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en; 4); ISBN: 9783863311148, S. 145–150.

Körber, Andreas: “Historical Thinking and Historical Competencies as Didactic Core Concepts”

Kör­ber, Andreas: “His­tor­i­cal Think­ing and His­tor­i­cal Com­pe­ten­cies as Didac­tic Core Con­cepts”. In: Bjerg, Helle; Kör­ber, Andreas; Lenz, Clau­dia; von Wrochem, Oliv­er (2014; Eds.): Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and Meth­ods. Expe­ri­ences and Results from the TeacMem Project. Berlin: Metropol (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en; 4); ISBN: 9783863311148, S. 69–96.

ger­ade erschienen:

Kör­ber, Andreas: “His­tor­i­cal Think­ing and His­tor­i­cal Com­pe­ten­cies as Didac­tic Core Con­cepts”. In: Bjerg, Helle; Kör­ber, Andreas; Lenz, Clau­dia; von Wrochem, Oliv­er (2014; Eds.): Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and Meth­ods. Expe­ri­ences and Results from the TeacMem Project. Berlin: Metropol (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en; 4); ISBN: 9783863311148, S. 69–96.

Neuerscheinung: Bjerg/Körber/Lenz/v. Wrochem (Eds.; 2014): Teaching Historical Memories

Bjerg, Helle; Kör­ber, Andreas; Lenz, Clau­dia; von Wrochem, Oliv­er (2014; Eds.): Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and Meth­ods. Expe­ri­ences and Results from the TeacMem Project. Berlin: Metropol (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en; 4); ISBN: 9783863311148.

Bjerg, Helle; Kör­ber, Andreas; Lenz, Clau­dia; von Wrochem, Oliv­er (2014; Eds.): Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and Meth­ods. Expe­ri­ences and Results from the TeacMem Project. Berlin: Metropol (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en; 4); ISBN: 9783863311148. Darin:

  • Kör­ber, Andreas: “His­tor­i­cal Think­ing and His­tor­i­cal Com­pe­ten­cies as Didac­tic Core Con­cepts”; pp. 69–96.
  • Kör­ber, Andreas “De-Con­struct­ing Mem­o­ry Cul­ture.” pp. 145–150.

 

 

 

In dieser Woche ist eine Pub­lika­tion erschienen, an welch­er Mit­glieder des Arbeits­bere­ichs beteiligt waren:

Bjerg, Helle/Körber, Andreas/Lenz, Clau­dia et al. (Hg.) (2014): Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive. Con­cepts and Meth­ods (= Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en, Band 4), Berlin.

Bjerg/Körber/Lenz/von Wrochem (Eds.; 2014)

Vgl. auch: Blog-Ein­trag im Blog des Projects TeacMem

TeacMem Developing Competence-Orientated Teaching on Historical Memories (2009–2013)

Abschlusskonferenz des TeacMem-Projekts zur Erinnerungskultur

Vom 19. bis 22. Novem­ber 2012 fand an der Uni­ver­sität Ham­burg und im Stu­dien­zen­trum der KZ-Gedenkstätte Neuengamme die Abschlusskon­ferenz des tri­na­tionalen Pro­jek­ts “TeacMem” statt.

Das Pro­jekt brachte — koor­diniert von Prof. Dr. Andreas Kör­ber — Forsch­er, Lehrerausbilder(innen), Lehrer(innen), Gedenkstät­ten- und Museumspädagog(inn)en sowie Studierende aus Däne­mark, Nor­we­gen und Deutsch­land zusam­men. In drei Seminaren/Konferenzen in Ham­burg-Neuengamme (2010), Kopen­hagen (2010) und Oslo (2012) erkun­de­ten sie die jew­eili­gen geteil­ten (“shared” und “divid­ed”) Erin­nerungskul­turen der Gast­ge­ber­län­der zum Zweit­en Weltkrieg und der gemein­samen Geschichte und erar­beit­eten Konzepte und Meth­o­d­en für die Inte­gra­tion dieses The­mengebits in die Lehrerbil­dung und den schulis­chen Geschicht­sun­ter­richt.

Auf der Abschlusskon­ferenz, zu der Lehrerausbilder(innen) und andere Multiplikatori(inn)en sowie Studierende aus allen drei Län­dern anreis­ten, präsen­tierte das Pro­jekt sowohl sein Vorge­hen als auch einige Ergeb­nisse. Als externe Gäste präsen­tierten Joke van der Leeuw-Roord, Direc­tor von EUROCLIO (dem europäis­chen Geschicht­slehrerver­band), Cecilie Feli­cia Stokholm Banke vom Dänis­chen Insti­tut für Inter­na­tionale Stu­di­en (DIIS) und Prof. Dr. Kristin Skin­stad van der Kooij vom Mas­ter­pro­gramm in Mul­ti­kul­tureller und Inter­na­tionaler Bil­dung des Oslo und Aker­shus Uni­ver­si­ty Col­lege zusät­zliche Aspek­te zum Gegen­stand und Kon­text des Pro­jek­ts sowie zu sein­er Eval­u­a­tion.

Die Kon­ferenz begann im Lichthof der Staats- und Uni­ver­sitäts­bib­lio­thek Carl von Ossi­et­zky  mit der Präsen­ta­tion des in Vor­bere­itung befind­lichen Buch­es “Teach­ing His­tor­i­cal Mem­o­ries in an Inter­cul­tur­al Per­spec­tive” (hgg. von Helle Bjerg, Andreas Kör­ber, Clau­dia Lenz und Oliv­er von Wrochem),welches Beiträge zu den Erfahrun­gen der Pro­jek­t­teil­nehmer in den drei inter­na­tionalen und inter­pro­fes­sionellen Begeg­nungssem­inaren sowie zu den Konzepten und Meth­o­d­en für Lehrer(innen)bildung und schulis­chen Geschicht­sun­ter­richt ver­sam­melt, aber auch solche, in welchen Mate­ri­alien zu beson­ders ertra­gre­ichen The­men­feldern präsen­tiert wer­den.

An diesem ersten Abend wurde auch auss­chnit­tweise eine Videodoku­men­ta­tion über die drei Pro­jek­t­sem­inare präsen­tiert, welche das “look and feel”, aber auch die Dynamik der Diskus­sio­nen und Lern­prozesse sicht­bar machte. Auf der Grund­lage dieses Video­ma­te­ri­als wird auch ein pädagoigis­ches Videokonzept entste­hen. Gefol­gt wurde diese Präsen­ta­tion vom Hauptvor­trag des Abends durch Cecilie Stokholm Banke über “Mem­o­ry Cul­ture as a Sub­ject of His­to­ry Didac­tics”.

Der zweite Tag bot den Teilnehmer(inn)en die Möglichkeit, die KZ-Gedenkstätte neuengamme ken­nen­zuler­nen, war aber vor allem der Präsen­ta­tion (und par­tiell dem Aus­pro­bieren) und der Diskus­sion von Aktiv­itäten und Meth­o­d­en des Pro­jek­ts gewid­met. neben ein­er Präsen­ta­tion der the­o­retis­chen Grund­la­gen des Pro­jek­ts im Kom­pe­tenz­mod­ell his­torischen Denkens nach “FUER Geschichts­be­wusst­sein” wur­den hier sowohl solche Meth­o­d­en vorgestellt, die der Ini­ti­ierung von Selb­stre­flex­ion und von Diskus­sion­sprozessen zu Beginn von Begeg­nungssem­inaren und in Pro­jek­ten dienen (Helle Bjerg und Katrine Vinther Scheibel), als auch solche, die die Re- und De-Kon­struk­tion von Erin­nerun­gen fördern (Clau­dia Lenz und Anne Tal­snes. dieser Aspekt stand auch im Zen­trum der Präsen­ta­tion eines Lehrpro­gramms zu Denkmälern an die Zer­störung des nor­wegis­chen Fis­cher­dorfs Telavag dort und im nahen Bergen, durch Jen­ny Heg­gvik und May Britt Wiel Haug­land, das eine Rei­he von instruk­tiv­en Fotos dieser Denkmäler enthält.

sowie solche für Aktiv­itäten im üblichen Klassen- oder Lern­grup­pen­ver­band (Har­ald Syse). darüber­hin­aus wur­den Konzepte und Mate­ri­alien für die The­ma­tisierung beson­ders ertra­gre­ich­er Prob­lemthe­men wie etwa die The­ma­tisierung von “Tätern” und die ambiva­len­ten Erin­nerun­gen im Zusam­men­hang mit der Ret­tungsak­tion der Weißen Busse präsen­tiert (Oliv­er von Wrochem; Ulrike Jensen).

Der dritte Tag war der Reflex­ion und Eval­u­a­tion gewid­met. Neben drei Studieren­den, die ihre Sicht auf Erfahrun­gen mit den Lern­prozessen aus einem der Begeg­nungssem­inare reflek­tierten, the­ma­tisierten Joke van der Leeuw-Roord von EUROCLIO und Kristin Skin­stad van der Kooij das Pro­jekt, seine Prämis­sen und Konzepte wie auch die Ergeb­nisse zum einen aus der Sicht des Geschicht­sler­nens zum Anderen aus der­jeni­gen der interkul­turellen Bil­dung. Bei­de Kom­men­ta­torin­nen würdigten den Beitrag des Pro­jek­ts zur Entwick­lung eines wichti­gen Feldes des Geschicht­sler­nens und emp­fahlen die Über­tra­gung sein­er Prinzip­i­en auf andere The­men der europäis­chen aber auch außereu­ropäis­chen Geschichte und Erin­nerung.

 

Vgl. auch

 

  • TeacMem Project Sponsors

    With the support of the COMENIUS programme of the European UnionWith the support of the COMENIUS programme of the European Union
    This project has been fund­ed with sup­port from the Euro­pean Com­mis­sion. This pub­li­ca­tion /communication reflects the views only of the author, and the Com­mis­sion can­not be held respon­si­ble for any use which may be made of the infor­ma­tion con­tained therein.Reg.-Nr.: 504689-LLP‑1–2009-1-DE-COMENIUS-CMP

 

Internationale Konferenz zur Erinnerungskultur in Ghana und Deutschland im Vergleich

Kör­ber, Andreas (20.9.2012): “His­tor­i­cal Remem­ber­ing and Learn­ing at Memo­ri­als in Ger­many” and a Cam­pus-Tour on “Decen­tral­ized Remem­ber­ing of the Crimes of Nation­al Social­ism”. Vor­trag auf der Tagung “Struc­tures and Process­es of Com­mem­o­rat­ing Cru­el­ties in Acad­eme and His­to­ry Teach­ing: The com­mem­o­ra­tion of the Transat­lantic Slave Trade and of the Nation­al Social­ist Crimes in Com­par­i­son” vom 20. bis 24. Sep­tem­ber 2012 in Ham­burg

 

Vom 20. bis 24. Sep­tem­ber 2012 fand in Ham­burg die vom Arbeits­bere­ich Geschichts­di­dak­tik der Uni­ver­sität Ham­burg gemein­same mit dem Stu­dien­zen­trum der KZ-Gedenkstätte Neuengamme und der Mis­sion­sakademie an der Uni­ver­sität Ham­burg ver­anstal­tete inter­na­tionale Kon­ferenz “Struc­tures and Process­es of Com­mem­o­rat­ing Cru­el­ties in Acad­eme and His­to­ry Teach­ing: The com­mem­o­ra­tion of the Transat­lantic Slave Trade and of the Nation­al Social­ist Crimes in Com­par­i­son” statt.

Die Kon­ferenz hat­te zum Ziel, Struk­turen und For­men des öffentlichen Erin­nerns in Deutsch­land an die nation­al­sozial­is­tis­chen Ver­brechen in Deutsch­land und Europa und diejeni­gen der öffentlichen Präsen­ta­tion der Geschichte des Transat­lantis­chen Sklaven­han­dels (wie auch der ein­heimis­chen Sklaverei) in Ghana sowie die gegen­wär­tige Rolle dieser The­men in schulis­chem und uni­ver­sitärem Geschicht­sler­nen zu ver­gle­ichen und auf die didak­tis­chen Poten­tiale ger­ade auch des Ver­gle­ichs hin auszu­loten. Dabei wurde auch die Bedeu­tung von Reli­gion und religiösem Denken sowohl für die Sklaverei, den Sklaven­han­del und ihre Über­win­dung als auch für his­torisches Denken und Erin­nern sowie Ler­nen an diesem Gegen­stand the­ma­tisiert.

Die The­matik der Tagung entsprach ein­er gemein­samen Idee von Prof. Dr. Kofi Dark­wah von der Uni­ver­si­ty od Edu­ca­tion in Win­ne­ba/Ghana und Prof. Dr. Andreas Kör­ber. Sie wurde in enger Zusam­me­nar­beit mit Kol­legin­nen und Kol­le­gen mehrerer Uni­ver­sitäten in Ghana von Jan Bre­it­en­stein, Dok­torand der Geschichts­di­dak­tik an der Uni­ver­sität Ham­burg, vor­bere­it­et und organ­isiert.

Ref­er­enten der Tagung waren:

  • Dr. Kofi Baku (Uni­ver­si­ty of Ghana, Legon; Head of His­to­ry Depart­ment): “Mem­o­ry and Memo­ri­al­is­ing Slav­ery and Slave Trade in Ghana: Whose mem­o­ry, Which memo­ri­als and for What Pur­pose?”
  • Prof. Dr. Andreas Kör­ber (Ham­burg Uni­ver­si­ty):  “His­tor­i­cal Remem­ber­ing and Learn­ing at Memo­ri­als in Ger­many” and a Cam­pus-Tour on “Decen­tral­ized Remem­ber­ing of the Crimes of Nation­al Social­ism”
  • Prof. Dr. Eliz­a­beth Amoah (Uni­ver­si­ty of Ghana, Legon;): “Reli­gion and Slav­ery in Ghana”
  • Prof. Dr. Wern­er Kahl (Acad­e­my of Mis­sion, Ham­burg): “The­ol­o­gy after Auschwitz: Where is god? — Expe­ri­ences and reflec­tions of African migrant pas­tors in Neuengamme.”
  • Dr. Ako­sua Per­bi (Uni­ver­si­ty of Ghana, Legon;): “Slav­ery in Ghana: The Unfor­got­ten Past”
  • Ulrike Jensen and Mar­co Küh­n­ert (Neuengamme Con­cen­tra­tion Camp Memo­r­i­al): Guid­ed Tour
  • Dr. Oliv­er von Wrochem (Neuengamme Con­cen­tra­tion Camp Memo­r­i­al Strudy cen­tre): “Neuengamme as a Memo­r­i­al and Place for His­tor­i­cal Learn­ing”
  • Nicholas Ivor (Head of the Ghana Muse­ums and Mon­u­ments Boards (GMMB) for the Cen­tral and West­ern Regions): “Cape Coast Cas­tle as a Memo­r­i­al and Place for His­tor­i­cal Learn­ing”
  • HMJoki­nen (Ham­burg): “Wands­bek World White Revis­it­ed” (com­mem­o­ra­tive per­for­mance)
  • Prof. Dr. Klaus Weber (Europa-Uni­ver­sität Viad­ri­na, Frankfurt/Oder): “There were many Schim­mel­manns: Hamburg’s and Cen­tral Europe’s Links with the Atlantic Slave Trade and Plan­ta­tion Economies, 16th to the 19th Cen­turies”
  • Jan Bre­it­en­stein (Ham­burg Uni­ver­si­ty): “Per­for­ma­tive Com­mem­o­rat­ing and Flu­idRemem­ber­ing of the Transat­lantic Slave Trade: Impulse or Frame­work for (process-ori­ent­ed) His­tor­i­cal Learn­ing?”
  • Dr. Yaw Ofusu-Kusi (Uni­ver­si­ty of Edu­ca­tion, Win­ne­ba/Ghana): “Vio­la­tions of Child­hood through Enslave­ment of Chil­dren in West Africa: Past, Present and the Future.”
  • Prof. Dr. (em.) Bodo von Bor­ries (Uni­ver­sität Ham­burg): „Transat­lantic Slave Trade“ and „German/ Euro­pean Holo­caust“ as Mas­ter Nar­ra­tives – Edu­ca­tion in between Com­mem­o­ra­tion of Geno­cides and Neces­si­ty of Human Rights.”
  • Dr. Felix Duo­du (Uni­ver­si­ty of Edu­ca­tion, Win­ne­ba/Ghana): “The rel­e­vance of soci­etal diver­si­ty for Inter eth­nic (his­to­ry) Teach­ing in Ghana.”
  • Dr. Clau­dia Lenz (The Euro­pean Werge­land Cen­tre, Oslo/Norway): “Com­pe­tence ori­ent­ed his­tor­i­cal learn­ing as inter­cul­tur­al learn­ing – expe­ri­ences from the TeacMem project.”
  • Joke van der Leeuw-Roord (Euro­clio, The Hague): “Chang­ing His­tor­i­cal Learn­ing in Schools and its impli­ca­tions for Teach­ing about Slav­ery and Nation­al Social­ism”
  • Emmanuel Koom­son (African Chris­t­ian Mis­sion A.C.M. Junior High School, Winneba/Ghana): “Slave Trade and its Com­mem­o­ra­tion as a Top­ic for His­tor­i­cal Learn­ing in Ghana.”
  • Hilde­gard Wack­er (Gym­na­si­um Cor­veystraße, Ham­burg and Ham­burg Uni­ver­si­ty): “Nation­al Social­ism and its Com­mem­o­ra­tion as a Top­ic for His­tor­i­cal Learn­ing in Ger­many.”

 

Körber, Andreas: Zeitgemäßes schulisches Geschichts-Lernen in Gedenkstätten. In: Das KZ Neuengamme und seine Außenlager. Geschichte, Nachgeschichte, Erinnerung, Bildung. Hrsg. von Oliver von Wrochem. Berlin 2010 (Neuengammer Kolloquien Bd. 1). S. 392–413.

Kör­ber, Andreas: Zeit­gemäßes schulis­ches Geschichts-Ler­nen in Gedenkstät­ten. In: Das KZ Neuengamme und seine Außen­lager. Geschichte, Nachgeschichte, Erin­nerung, Bil­dung. Hrsg. von Oliv­er von Wrochem. Berlin 2010 (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en Bd. 1). S. 392–413.

Kör­ber, Andreas: Zeit­gemäßes schulis­ches Geschichts-Ler­nen in Gedenkstät­ten. In: Das KZ Neuengamme und seine Außen­lager. Geschichte, Nachgeschichte, Erin­nerung, Bil­dung. Hrsg. von Oliv­er von Wrochem. Berlin 2010 (Neuengam­mer Kol­lo­qui­en Bd. 1). S. 392–413.